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Mol. Cells 2000; 10(3): 247-252

Published online June 30, 2000

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Activation of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase by 4-1BB (CD137), a T Cell Co-stimulation Molecule

Hong-Hee Kim, KyuBum Kwack, and Zang Hee Lee

Abstract

It has been widely accepted that T cell activation requires two signals; one from the binding of the antigen/major histocompatibility complex to the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex and the other from the interaction between a surface molecule on antigen presenting cells and its receptor on T cells. The second signal is considered as co-stimulatory and the B7/CD28 pair has been well studied as a prototype. Recently 4-1BB (CD137) has been characterized as another co-stimulatory molecule for T cell activation. However, unlike the CD28/B7 pair, 4-1BB and its ligand 4-1BBL constitute a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor/TNF pair superfamily. The signaling mechanism of 4-1BB has not been revealed in detail. To investigate whether 4-1BB takes the signaling pathways analogous to those for TNF receptors, we generated polyclonal antibodies against human 4-1BB and 4-1BBL and established stable transfectants of the receptor and the ligand with a high level of cell surface expression. Over-expression of h4-1BB was found to result in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293. In T cells, it has been previously demonstrated that JNK activation requires dual signals such as the ligation of TCRlCD3 complex plus CD28 co-stimulation or PMA plus ionomycin. The JNK activation by 4-1BB in Jurkat T cells was also found to require stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex, consistent with the notion that 4-1BB functions as a co-stimulatory molecule for T cell activation.

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2000; 10(3): 247-252

Published online June 30, 2000

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Activation of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase by 4-1BB (CD137), a T Cell Co-stimulation Molecule

Hong-Hee Kim, KyuBum Kwack, and Zang Hee Lee

Abstract

It has been widely accepted that T cell activation requires two signals; one from the binding of the antigen/major histocompatibility complex to the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex and the other from the interaction between a surface molecule on antigen presenting cells and its receptor on T cells. The second signal is considered as co-stimulatory and the B7/CD28 pair has been well studied as a prototype. Recently 4-1BB (CD137) has been characterized as another co-stimulatory molecule for T cell activation. However, unlike the CD28/B7 pair, 4-1BB and its ligand 4-1BBL constitute a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor/TNF pair superfamily. The signaling mechanism of 4-1BB has not been revealed in detail. To investigate whether 4-1BB takes the signaling pathways analogous to those for TNF receptors, we generated polyclonal antibodies against human 4-1BB and 4-1BBL and established stable transfectants of the receptor and the ligand with a high level of cell surface expression. Over-expression of h4-1BB was found to result in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293. In T cells, it has been previously demonstrated that JNK activation requires dual signals such as the ligation of TCRlCD3 complex plus CD28 co-stimulation or PMA plus ionomycin. The JNK activation by 4-1BB in Jurkat T cells was also found to require stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex, consistent with the notion that 4-1BB functions as a co-stimulatory molecule for T cell activation.

Mol. Cells
Dec 31, 2021 Vol.44 No.12, pp. 861~919
COVER PICTURE
Structure of the fly peripheral neurons in the fly head. Flies have basic sensory organs including eyes for vision, antennae and maxillary palps for olfaction, and proboscis (magenta) for gustation which can be labelled with monoclonal antibody 22C10. The figure is a 3D reconstructed image with 30 slices of confocal sections with 3 μm interval. It shows that the proboscis is required for sensing attractive carboxylic acids such as glycolic acid, citric acid, and lactic acid (Shrestha and Lee, pp. 900-910).

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