Kon Baek " /> nd Chung-Mo Park *

" /> Kon Baek, Pil Joon Seo, and Chung-Mo Park*

" /> Kon Baek, Pil Joon Seo, and Chung-Mo Park*

. Mol. Cells 2011;31:361-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0048-0">
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Mol. Cells 2011; 31(4): 361-369

Published online April 30, 2011

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0048-0

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene In-duces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

Kon Baek1,3, Pil Joon Seo1,3, and Chung-Mo Park1,2,*

1Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 2Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 3These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: cmpark@snu.ac.kr

Received: December 8, 2011; Revised: January 23, 2011; Accepted: January 24, 2011

Abstract

The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activi-ties. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome com-plexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fu-sion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress.

Keywords AAA-type ATPase, abiotic stress, abscisic acid, Arabidopsis, seed development

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2011; 31(4): 361-369

Published online April 30, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0048-0

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Activation of a Mitochondrial ATPase Gene In-duces Abnormal Seed Development in Arabidopsis

Kon Baek1,3, Pil Joon Seo1,3, and Chung-Mo Park1,2,*

1Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 2Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 3These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: cmpark@snu.ac.kr

Received: December 8, 2011; Revised: January 23, 2011; Accepted: January 24, 2011

Abstract

The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) proteins are widespread in living organisms. Some of the AAA-type ATPases possess metalloprotease activi-ties. Other members constitute the 26S proteasome com-plexes. In recent years, a few AAA members have been implicated in vesicle-mediated secretion, membrane fu-sion, cellular organelle biogenesis, and hypersensitive responses (HR) in plants. However, the physiological roles and biochemical activities of plant AAA proteins have not yet been defined at the molecular level, and regulatory mechanisms underlying their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a mitochondrial AAA protein, ATPase-in-Seed-Development (ASD), induces morphological and anatomical defects in seed maturation. The ASD gene is expressed at a high level during the seed maturation process and in mature seeds but is repressed rapidly in germinating seeds. Transgenic plants overexpressing the ASD gene are morphologically normal. However, seed formation is severely disrupted in the transgenic plants. The ASD gene is induced by abiotic stresses, such as low temperatures and high salinity, in an abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent manner. The ASD protein possesses ATPase activity and is localized into the mitochondria. Our observations suggest that ASD may play a role in seed maturation by influencing mitochondrial function under abiotic stress.

Keywords: AAA-type ATPase, abiotic stress, abscisic acid, Arabidopsis, seed development

Mol. Cells
May 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.5, pp. 273~352
COVER PICTURE
Fe2+ ion depletion-induced expression of BΔGFP at the early stage of leaf development (Choi et al., pp. 294-305).

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