Min Jung Lee" /> Soojin Lee " /> Min Jung Lee, Seung Hwan Park, Ju Hua Han, Yoon Ki Hong, Soojin Hwang, Soojin Lee, Darae Kim, Seung Yeop Han, Eun Soo Kim, and Kyoung Sang Cho*" /> Min Jung Lee, Seung Hwan Park, Ju Hua Han, Yoon Ki Hong, Soojin Hwang, Soojin Lee, Darae Kim, Seung Yeop Han, Eun Soo Kim, and Kyoung Sang Cho*. Mol. Cells 2011;31:337-42. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0042-6">
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Mol. Cells 2011; 31(4): 337-342

Published online April 30, 2011

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0042-6

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

The Effects of Hempseed Meal Intake and Linoleic Acid on Drosophila Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Hypercholesterolemia

Min Jung Lee1,2, Seung Hwan Park1,2, Ju Hua Han1, Yoon Ki Hong1, Soojin Hwang1, Soojin Lee1, Darae Kim1, Seung Yeop Han1, Eun Soo Kim1, and Kyoung Sang Cho1,*

1Department of Biological Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea, 2These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: kscho@konkuk.ac.kr

Received: November 1, 2011; Revised: December 30, 2011; Accepted: January 5, 2011

Abstract

Hempseed is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which have potential as therapeutic compounds for the treatment of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular dis-ease. However, the effect of hempseed meal (HSM) intake on the animal models of these diseases has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of the intake of HSM and PUFAs on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and neurological phenotypes, and cholesterol uptake, using Drosophila models. HSM intake was shown to reduce H2O2 toxicity markedly, indicating that HSM exerts a profound antioxidant effect. Meanwhile, intake of HSM, as well as linoleic or linolenic acids (major PUFA components of HSM) was shown to ameliorate Aβ42-induced eye degeneration, thus suggesting that these compounds exert a protective effect against Aβ42 cytotoxicity. On the contrary, locomotion and longevity in the Parkinson’s disease model and eye degeneration in the Huntington’s disease model were unaffected by HSM feeding. Additionally, intake of HSM or linoleic acid was shown to reduce cholesterol uptake significantly. Moreover, linoleic acid intake has been shown to delay pupariation, and cholesterol feeding rescued the linoleic acid-induced larval growth delay, thereby indicating that linoleic acid acts antagonistically with cholesterol during larval growth. In conclusion, our results indicate that HSM and linoleic acid exert inhibitory effects on both Aβ42 cytotoxicity and cholesterol uptake, and are potential candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease.

Keywords Alzheimer’s disease, cholesterol, Drosophila, hempseed meal, polyunsaturated fatty acids

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2011; 31(4): 337-342

Published online April 30, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0042-6

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The Effects of Hempseed Meal Intake and Linoleic Acid on Drosophila Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Hypercholesterolemia

Min Jung Lee1,2, Seung Hwan Park1,2, Ju Hua Han1, Yoon Ki Hong1, Soojin Hwang1, Soojin Lee1, Darae Kim1, Seung Yeop Han1, Eun Soo Kim1, and Kyoung Sang Cho1,*

1Department of Biological Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea, 2These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: kscho@konkuk.ac.kr

Received: November 1, 2011; Revised: December 30, 2011; Accepted: January 5, 2011

Abstract

Hempseed is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which have potential as therapeutic compounds for the treatment of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular dis-ease. However, the effect of hempseed meal (HSM) intake on the animal models of these diseases has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we assessed the effects of the intake of HSM and PUFAs on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and neurological phenotypes, and cholesterol uptake, using Drosophila models. HSM intake was shown to reduce H2O2 toxicity markedly, indicating that HSM exerts a profound antioxidant effect. Meanwhile, intake of HSM, as well as linoleic or linolenic acids (major PUFA components of HSM) was shown to ameliorate Aβ42-induced eye degeneration, thus suggesting that these compounds exert a protective effect against Aβ42 cytotoxicity. On the contrary, locomotion and longevity in the Parkinson’s disease model and eye degeneration in the Huntington’s disease model were unaffected by HSM feeding. Additionally, intake of HSM or linoleic acid was shown to reduce cholesterol uptake significantly. Moreover, linoleic acid intake has been shown to delay pupariation, and cholesterol feeding rescued the linoleic acid-induced larval growth delay, thereby indicating that linoleic acid acts antagonistically with cholesterol during larval growth. In conclusion, our results indicate that HSM and linoleic acid exert inhibitory effects on both Aβ42 cytotoxicity and cholesterol uptake, and are potential candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, cholesterol, Drosophila, hempseed meal, polyunsaturated fatty acids

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.11, pp. 763~867
COVER PICTURE
Naive (cyan) and axotomized (magenta) retinal ganglion cell axons in Xenopus tropicalis (Choi et al., pp. 846-854).

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