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Mol. Cells 2010; 29(3): 254-258

Published online March 31, 2010

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Inhibition of Primary Roots and Stimulation of Lateral Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166 Is through Both Auxin-Dependent and -Independent Signaling Pathways

Chun-Lin Shi1,4, Hyo-Bee Park1, Jong Suk Lee1,2, Sangryeol Ryu2, and Choong-Min Ryu1,3,*

Abstract

The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 was previously reported to promote plant growth and induce resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the influence of strain 90-166 on root development was studied in vitro. We observed inhibition of primary root elongation, enhanced lateral root emergence, and early emergence of second order lateral roots after inoculation with strain 90-166 at a certain distance from the root. Using the DR5::GUS transgenic A. thaliana plant and an auxin transport inhibitor, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, the altered root development was still elicited by strain 90-166, indicating that this was not a result of changes in plant auxin levels. Intriguingly, indole-3-acetic acid, a major auxin chemical, was only identified just above the detection limit in liquid culture of strain 90-166 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Focusing on bacterial determinants of the root alterations, we found that primary root elongation was inhibited in seedlings treated with cell supernatant (secreted compounds), while lateral root formation was induced in seedlings treated with lysate supernatant (intracellular compounds). Further study revealed that the alteration of root development elicited by strain 90-166 involved the jasmonate, ethylene, and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Collectively, our results suggest that strain 90-166 can contribute to plant root development via multiple signaling pathways.

Keywords thaliana, auxin, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, root development, Serratia marcescens

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 29(3): 254-258

Published online March 31, 2010

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Inhibition of Primary Roots and Stimulation of Lateral Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166 Is through Both Auxin-Dependent and -Independent Signaling Pathways

Chun-Lin Shi1,4, Hyo-Bee Park1, Jong Suk Lee1,2, Sangryeol Ryu2, and Choong-Min Ryu1,3,*

Abstract

The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 was previously reported to promote plant growth and induce resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the influence of strain 90-166 on root development was studied in vitro. We observed inhibition of primary root elongation, enhanced lateral root emergence, and early emergence of second order lateral roots after inoculation with strain 90-166 at a certain distance from the root. Using the DR5::GUS transgenic A. thaliana plant and an auxin transport inhibitor, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, the altered root development was still elicited by strain 90-166, indicating that this was not a result of changes in plant auxin levels. Intriguingly, indole-3-acetic acid, a major auxin chemical, was only identified just above the detection limit in liquid culture of strain 90-166 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Focusing on bacterial determinants of the root alterations, we found that primary root elongation was inhibited in seedlings treated with cell supernatant (secreted compounds), while lateral root formation was induced in seedlings treated with lysate supernatant (intracellular compounds). Further study revealed that the alteration of root development elicited by strain 90-166 involved the jasmonate, ethylene, and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Collectively, our results suggest that strain 90-166 can contribute to plant root development via multiple signaling pathways.

Keywords: thaliana, auxin, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, root development, Serratia marcescens

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.11, pp. 763~867
COVER PICTURE
Naive (cyan) and axotomized (magenta) retinal ganglion cell axons in Xenopus tropicalis (Choi et al., pp. 846-854).

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