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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(5): 423-430

Published online November 30, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0139-3

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

The Robust Phylogeny of Korean Wild Boar
(Sus scrofa coreanus) Using Partial D-Loop
Sequence of mtDNA

In-Cheol Cho, Sang-Hyun Han, Meiying Fang, Sung-Soo Lee, Moon-Suck Ko, Hang Lee,
Hyun-Tae Lim, Chae-Kyoung Yoo, Jun-Heon Lee, and Jin-Tae Jeon

Received: June 17, 2009; Revised: August 25, 2009; Accepted: September 4, 2009

Abstract

In order to elucidate the precise phylogenetic relationships of Korean wild boar (Sus scrofa coreanus), a partial mtDNA D-loop region (1,274 bp, NC_000845 nucleotide positions 16576-1236) was sequenced among 56 Korean wild boars. In total, 25 haplotypes were identified and classified into four distinct subgroups (K1 to K4) based on Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An extended analysis, adding 139 wild boars sampled worldwide, confirmed that Korean wild boars clearly belong to the Asian wild boar cluster. Unexpectedly, the Myanmarese/Thai wild boar population was detected on the same branch as Korean wild boar subgroups K3 and K4. A parsimonious median-joining network analysis including all Asian wild boar haplotypes again revealed four maternal lineages of Korean wild boars, which corresponded to the four Korean wild boar subgroups identified previously. In an additional analysis, we supplemented the Asian wild boar network with 34 Korean and Chinese domestic pig haplotypes. We found only one haplotype, C31, that was shared by Chinese wild, Chinese domestic and Korean domestic pigs. In contrast to our expectation that Korean wild boars contributed to the gene pool of Korean native pigs, these data clearly suggest that Korean native pigs would be introduced from China after domestication from Chinese wild boars.

Keywords D-loop, domestication, Korean wild boar, network, phylogeny, phylogeography

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(5): 423-430

Published online November 30, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0139-3

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The Robust Phylogeny of Korean Wild Boar
(Sus scrofa coreanus) Using Partial D-Loop
Sequence of mtDNA

In-Cheol Cho, Sang-Hyun Han, Meiying Fang, Sung-Soo Lee, Moon-Suck Ko, Hang Lee,
Hyun-Tae Lim, Chae-Kyoung Yoo, Jun-Heon Lee, and Jin-Tae Jeon

Received: June 17, 2009; Revised: August 25, 2009; Accepted: September 4, 2009

Abstract

In order to elucidate the precise phylogenetic relationships of Korean wild boar (Sus scrofa coreanus), a partial mtDNA D-loop region (1,274 bp, NC_000845 nucleotide positions 16576-1236) was sequenced among 56 Korean wild boars. In total, 25 haplotypes were identified and classified into four distinct subgroups (K1 to K4) based on Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An extended analysis, adding 139 wild boars sampled worldwide, confirmed that Korean wild boars clearly belong to the Asian wild boar cluster. Unexpectedly, the Myanmarese/Thai wild boar population was detected on the same branch as Korean wild boar subgroups K3 and K4. A parsimonious median-joining network analysis including all Asian wild boar haplotypes again revealed four maternal lineages of Korean wild boars, which corresponded to the four Korean wild boar subgroups identified previously. In an additional analysis, we supplemented the Asian wild boar network with 34 Korean and Chinese domestic pig haplotypes. We found only one haplotype, C31, that was shared by Chinese wild, Chinese domestic and Korean domestic pigs. In contrast to our expectation that Korean wild boars contributed to the gene pool of Korean native pigs, these data clearly suggest that Korean native pigs would be introduced from China after domestication from Chinese wild boars.

Keywords: D-loop, domestication, Korean wild boar, network, phylogeny, phylogeography

Mol. Cells
Dec 31, 2021 Vol.44 No.12, pp. 861~919
COVER PICTURE
Structure of the fly peripheral neurons in the fly head. Flies have basic sensory organs including eyes for vision, antennae and maxillary palps for olfaction, and proboscis (magenta) for gustation which can be labelled with monoclonal antibody 22C10. The figure is a 3D reconstructed image with 30 slices of confocal sections with 3 μm interval. It shows that the proboscis is required for sensing attractive carboxylic acids such as glycolic acid, citric acid, and lactic acid (Shrestha and Lee, pp. 900-910).

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