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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(4): 397-401

Published online September 30, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0135-7

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for the
Biological Synthesis of 7-O-Xylosyl Naringenin

Dinesh Simkhada, EuiMin Kim, Hei Chan Lee, and Jae Kyung Sohng

Received: July 27, 2009; Accepted: August 26, 2009

Abstract

Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds that have been recognized as important due to their physiological and pharmacological roles and their health benefits. Glycosylation of flavonoids has a wide range of effects on flavonoid solubility, stability, and bioavailability. We previously generated the E. coli BL21 (DE3) Δpgi host by deleting the glucose-phosphate isomerase (Pgi) gene in E. coli BL21 (DE3). This host was further engineered for whole-cell biotransformation by integration of galU from E. coli K12, and expression of calS8 (UDP-glucose dehydrogenase) and calS9 (UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase) from Micromonospora echinospora spp. calichensis and arGt-4 (7-O-glycosyltransferase) from Arabidopsis thaliana to form E. coli (US89Gt-4), which is expected to produce glycosylated flavonoids. To test the designed system, the engineered host was fed with naringenin as a substrate, and naringenin 7-O-xyloside, a glycosylated naringenin product, was detected. Product was verified by HPLC-LC/MS and ESI-MS/MS analyses. The recon-structed host can be applied for the production of various classes of glycosylated flavonoids.

Keywords 7-O-xylosyl naringenin, glycosylation, metabolic engineering, naringenin, UDP-D-xylose

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(4): 397-401

Published online October 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0135-7

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli for the
Biological Synthesis of 7-O-Xylosyl Naringenin

Dinesh Simkhada, EuiMin Kim, Hei Chan Lee, and Jae Kyung Sohng

Received: July 27, 2009; Accepted: August 26, 2009

Abstract

Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds that have been recognized as important due to their physiological and pharmacological roles and their health benefits. Glycosylation of flavonoids has a wide range of effects on flavonoid solubility, stability, and bioavailability. We previously generated the E. coli BL21 (DE3) Δpgi host by deleting the glucose-phosphate isomerase (Pgi) gene in E. coli BL21 (DE3). This host was further engineered for whole-cell biotransformation by integration of galU from E. coli K12, and expression of calS8 (UDP-glucose dehydrogenase) and calS9 (UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase) from Micromonospora echinospora spp. calichensis and arGt-4 (7-O-glycosyltransferase) from Arabidopsis thaliana to form E. coli (US89Gt-4), which is expected to produce glycosylated flavonoids. To test the designed system, the engineered host was fed with naringenin as a substrate, and naringenin 7-O-xyloside, a glycosylated naringenin product, was detected. Product was verified by HPLC-LC/MS and ESI-MS/MS analyses. The recon-structed host can be applied for the production of various classes of glycosylated flavonoids.

Keywords: 7-O-xylosyl naringenin, glycosylation, metabolic engineering, naringenin, UDP-D-xylose

Mol. Cells
Feb 28, 2023 Vol.46 No.2, pp. 69~129
COVER PICTURE
The bulk tissue is a heterogeneous mixture of various cell types, which is depicted as a skein of intertwined threads with diverse colors each of which represents a unique cell type. Single-cell omics analysis untangles efficiently the skein according to the color by providing information of molecules at individual cells and interpretation of such information based on different cell types. The molecules that can be profiled at the individual cell by single-cell omics analysis includes DNA (bottom middle), RNA (bottom right), and protein (bottom left). This special issue reviews single-cell technologies and computational methods that have been developed for the single-cell omics analysis and how they have been applied to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of biological and pathological phenomena at the single-cell level.

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