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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(2): 105-109

Published online August 31, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0108-x

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

The Expression Patterns of AtBSMT1 and
AtSAGT1 Encoding a Salicylic Acid (SA)
Methyltransferase and a SA Glucosyltransferase,
Respectively, in Arabidopsis Plants with Altered
Defense Responses

Jong Tae Song, Yeon Jong Koo, Jong-Beum Park, Yean Joo Seo, Yeon-Jeong Cho, Hak Soo Seo, and Yang Do Choi

Received: May 11, 2009; Revised: June 24, 2009; Accepted: June 24, 2009

Abstract

We reported previously that overexpression of a salicylic acid (SA) methyltransferase1 gene from rice (OsBSMT1) or a SA glucosyltransferase1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSAGT1) leads to increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae due to reduced SA levels. To further examine their roles in the defense responses, we assayed the transcript levels of AtBSMT1 or AtSAGT1 in plants with altered levels of SA and/or other defense components. These data showed that AtSAGT1 expression is regulated partially by SA, or nonexpressor of pathogenesis related protein1, whereas AtBSMT1 expression was induced in SA-deficient mutant plants. In addition, we produced the transgenic Arabidopsis plants with RNAi-mediated inhibition of AtSAGT1 and isolated a null mutant of AtBSMT1, and then analyzed their phenotypes. A T-DNA insertion mutation in the AtBSMT1 resulted in reduced methyl salicylate (MeSA) levels upon P. syringae infection. However, accumulation of SA and glucosyl SA was similar in both the atbsmt1 and wild-type plants, indicating the presence of another SA methyltransferase or an alternative pathway for MeSA production. The AtSAGT1-RNAi line exhibited no altered phenotypes upon pathogen infection, compared to wild-type plants, suggesting that (an)other SA glucosyl-transferase(s) in Arabidopsis plants may be important for the pathogenesis of P. syringae.

Keywords methyl salicylate (MeSA), pathogenesis, salicylic acid (SA), SA glucosyltransferase (SA GT), SA methyltransferase (SA MT)

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(2): 105-109

Published online August 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0108-x

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The Expression Patterns of AtBSMT1 and
AtSAGT1 Encoding a Salicylic Acid (SA)
Methyltransferase and a SA Glucosyltransferase,
Respectively, in Arabidopsis Plants with Altered
Defense Responses

Jong Tae Song, Yeon Jong Koo, Jong-Beum Park, Yean Joo Seo, Yeon-Jeong Cho, Hak Soo Seo, and Yang Do Choi

Received: May 11, 2009; Revised: June 24, 2009; Accepted: June 24, 2009

Abstract

We reported previously that overexpression of a salicylic acid (SA) methyltransferase1 gene from rice (OsBSMT1) or a SA glucosyltransferase1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSAGT1) leads to increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae due to reduced SA levels. To further examine their roles in the defense responses, we assayed the transcript levels of AtBSMT1 or AtSAGT1 in plants with altered levels of SA and/or other defense components. These data showed that AtSAGT1 expression is regulated partially by SA, or nonexpressor of pathogenesis related protein1, whereas AtBSMT1 expression was induced in SA-deficient mutant plants. In addition, we produced the transgenic Arabidopsis plants with RNAi-mediated inhibition of AtSAGT1 and isolated a null mutant of AtBSMT1, and then analyzed their phenotypes. A T-DNA insertion mutation in the AtBSMT1 resulted in reduced methyl salicylate (MeSA) levels upon P. syringae infection. However, accumulation of SA and glucosyl SA was similar in both the atbsmt1 and wild-type plants, indicating the presence of another SA methyltransferase or an alternative pathway for MeSA production. The AtSAGT1-RNAi line exhibited no altered phenotypes upon pathogen infection, compared to wild-type plants, suggesting that (an)other SA glucosyl-transferase(s) in Arabidopsis plants may be important for the pathogenesis of P. syringae.

Keywords: methyl salicylate (MeSA), pathogenesis, salicylic acid (SA), SA glucosyltransferase (SA GT), SA methyltransferase (SA MT)

Mol. Cells
Dec 31, 2021 Vol.44 No.12, pp. 861~919
COVER PICTURE
Structure of the fly peripheral neurons in the fly head. Flies have basic sensory organs including eyes for vision, antennae and maxillary palps for olfaction, and proboscis (magenta) for gustation which can be labelled with monoclonal antibody 22C10. The figure is a 3D reconstructed image with 30 slices of confocal sections with 3 μm interval. It shows that the proboscis is required for sensing attractive carboxylic acids such as glycolic acid, citric acid, and lactic acid (Shrestha and Lee, pp. 900-910).

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