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Mol. Cells 2009; 27(3): 283-289

Published online March 31, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0036-9

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Curcumin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Growth of Human Burkitt's Lymphoma in Xenograft Mouse Model

Zai-xin Li, Ke-qing Ouyang, Xv Jiang, Dong Wang, and Yinghe Hu

Received: March 27, 2008; Revised: December 8, 2008; Accepted: December 19, 2008

Abstract

Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from rhizomes of curcuma Curcuma species, has been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and anti-oxidative properties. However, the mechanism of action of the compound remains poorly understood. In this report, we have analyzed the effects of curcumin on the cell proliferation of Burkitt’s lymphoma Raji cells. The results demonstrated that curcumin could effectively inhibit the growth of Raji cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies indicated that curcumin treatment resulted in apoptosis of cells. Biochemical analysis showed that the expression of Bax, Bid and cytochrome C were up-regulated, while the expression of oncogene c-Myc was down regulated after curcumin treatment. Furthermore, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage was induced by the compound. Interestingly, the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression was not significantly changed in Raji cells after curcumin treatment. These results suggested that the mechanism of action of curcumin was to induce mitochondrial damage and therefore led to Raji cell apoptosis. We further investigated the in vivo effects of curcumin on the growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. The results showed that curcumin could effectively inhibit tumor growth in the xenograft mouse model. The overall results showed that curcumin could suppress the growth of Burkitt’s lymphoma cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems.

Keywords apoptosis, curcumin, lymphoma, mitochondria, proliferation, xenograft

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 27(3): 283-289

Published online March 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0036-9

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Curcumin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Growth of Human Burkitt's Lymphoma in Xenograft Mouse Model

Zai-xin Li, Ke-qing Ouyang, Xv Jiang, Dong Wang, and Yinghe Hu

Received: March 27, 2008; Revised: December 8, 2008; Accepted: December 19, 2008

Abstract

Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from rhizomes of curcuma Curcuma species, has been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and anti-oxidative properties. However, the mechanism of action of the compound remains poorly understood. In this report, we have analyzed the effects of curcumin on the cell proliferation of Burkitt’s lymphoma Raji cells. The results demonstrated that curcumin could effectively inhibit the growth of Raji cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies indicated that curcumin treatment resulted in apoptosis of cells. Biochemical analysis showed that the expression of Bax, Bid and cytochrome C were up-regulated, while the expression of oncogene c-Myc was down regulated after curcumin treatment. Furthermore, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage was induced by the compound. Interestingly, the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression was not significantly changed in Raji cells after curcumin treatment. These results suggested that the mechanism of action of curcumin was to induce mitochondrial damage and therefore led to Raji cell apoptosis. We further investigated the in vivo effects of curcumin on the growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. The results showed that curcumin could effectively inhibit tumor growth in the xenograft mouse model. The overall results showed that curcumin could suppress the growth of Burkitt’s lymphoma cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems.

Keywords: apoptosis, curcumin, lymphoma, mitochondria, proliferation, xenograft

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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