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Mol. Cells 2008; 25(3): 323-331

Published online May 31, 2008

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to Challenge by Pseudomonas syringae

Min Gab Kim, Sun Young Kim, Woe Yeon Kim, David Mackey and Sang Yeol Lee

Abstract

Plants are continually exposed to a variety of potentially pathogenic microbes, and the interactions between plants and pathogenic invaders determine the outcome, disease or disease resistance. To defend themselves, plants have developed a sophisticated immune system. Unlike animals, however, they do not have specialized immune cells and, thus all plant cells appear to have the innate ability to recognize pathogens and turn on an appropriate defense response. Using genetic, genomic and biochemical methods, tremendous advances have been made in understanding how plants recognize pathogens and mount effective defenses. The primary immune response is induced by microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). MAMP receptors recognize the presence of probable pathogens and evoke defense. In the co-evolution of plant-microbe interactions, pathogens gained the ability to make and deliver effector proteins to suppress MAMP-induced defense responses. In response to effector proteins, plants acquired R-proteins to directly or indirectly monitor the presence of effector proteins and activate an effective defense response. In this review we will describe and discuss the plant immune responses induced by two types of elicitors, PAMPs and effector proteins.

Keywords Gene-for-gene, MAMP, R-protein, SAR, Guard hypothesis, Effector protein, HR, MAMP receptor

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2008; 25(3): 323-331

Published online May 31, 2008

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to Challenge by Pseudomonas syringae

Min Gab Kim, Sun Young Kim, Woe Yeon Kim, David Mackey and Sang Yeol Lee

Abstract

Plants are continually exposed to a variety of potentially pathogenic microbes, and the interactions between plants and pathogenic invaders determine the outcome, disease or disease resistance. To defend themselves, plants have developed a sophisticated immune system. Unlike animals, however, they do not have specialized immune cells and, thus all plant cells appear to have the innate ability to recognize pathogens and turn on an appropriate defense response. Using genetic, genomic and biochemical methods, tremendous advances have been made in understanding how plants recognize pathogens and mount effective defenses. The primary immune response is induced by microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). MAMP receptors recognize the presence of probable pathogens and evoke defense. In the co-evolution of plant-microbe interactions, pathogens gained the ability to make and deliver effector proteins to suppress MAMP-induced defense responses. In response to effector proteins, plants acquired R-proteins to directly or indirectly monitor the presence of effector proteins and activate an effective defense response. In this review we will describe and discuss the plant immune responses induced by two types of elicitors, PAMPs and effector proteins.

Keywords: Gene-for-gene, MAMP, R-protein, SAR, Guard hypothesis, Effector protein, HR, MAMP receptor

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.11, pp. 763~867
COVER PICTURE
Naive (cyan) and axotomized (magenta) retinal ganglion cell axons in Xenopus tropicalis (Choi et al., pp. 846-854).

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