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Mol. Cells 2007; 23(2): 192-197

Published online January 1, 1970

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Marker-assisted Genotype Analysis of Bulb Colors in Segregating Populations of Onions (Allium cepa)

Sunggil Kim, Haejeen Bang, Kil-Sun Yoo, Leonard Pike

Abstract

Bulb color in onions (Allium cepa) is an important trait whose complex inheritance mechanism involves epistatic interactions among major color-related loci. Recent studies revealed that inactivation of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) in the anthocyanin synthesis pathway was responsible for the color differences between yellow and red onions, and two recessive alleles of the anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) gene were responsible for a pink bulb color. Based on mutations in the recessive alleles of these two genes, PCR-based markers for allelic selection were developed. In this study, genotype analysis of onions from segregating populations was carried out using these PCR-based markers. Segregating populations were derived from the cross between yellow and red onions. Five yellow and thirteen pink bulbs from one segregating breeding line were genotyped for the two genes. Four pink bulbs were heterozygous for the DFR gene, which explains the continuous segregation of yellow and pink colors in this line. Most pink onions were homozygous recessive for the ANS gene, except for two heterozygotes. This finding indicated that the homozygous recessive ANS gene was primarily responsible for the pink color in this line. The two pink onions, heterozygous for the ANS gene, were also heterozygous for the DFR gene, which indicated that the pink color was produced by incomplete dominance of a red color gene over that of yellow. One pink line and six other segregating breeding lines were also analyzed. The genotyping results matched perfectly with phenotypic color segregation.

Keywords Allium cepa; Anthocyanin; Bulb Color; Markerassisted Selection (MAS);, Onion; PCR-based Markers

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2007; 23(2): 192-197

Published online April 30, 2007

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Marker-assisted Genotype Analysis of Bulb Colors in Segregating Populations of Onions (Allium cepa)

Sunggil Kim, Haejeen Bang, Kil-Sun Yoo, Leonard Pike

Abstract

Bulb color in onions (Allium cepa) is an important trait whose complex inheritance mechanism involves epistatic interactions among major color-related loci. Recent studies revealed that inactivation of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) in the anthocyanin synthesis pathway was responsible for the color differences between yellow and red onions, and two recessive alleles of the anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) gene were responsible for a pink bulb color. Based on mutations in the recessive alleles of these two genes, PCR-based markers for allelic selection were developed. In this study, genotype analysis of onions from segregating populations was carried out using these PCR-based markers. Segregating populations were derived from the cross between yellow and red onions. Five yellow and thirteen pink bulbs from one segregating breeding line were genotyped for the two genes. Four pink bulbs were heterozygous for the DFR gene, which explains the continuous segregation of yellow and pink colors in this line. Most pink onions were homozygous recessive for the ANS gene, except for two heterozygotes. This finding indicated that the homozygous recessive ANS gene was primarily responsible for the pink color in this line. The two pink onions, heterozygous for the ANS gene, were also heterozygous for the DFR gene, which indicated that the pink color was produced by incomplete dominance of a red color gene over that of yellow. One pink line and six other segregating breeding lines were also analyzed. The genotyping results matched perfectly with phenotypic color segregation.

Keywords: Allium cepa, Anthocyanin, Bulb Color, Markerassisted Selection (MAS),, Onion, PCR-based Markers

Mol. Cells
Jan 31, 2023 Vol.46 No.1, pp. 1~67
COVER PICTURE
RNAs form diverse shapes and play multiple functions as central molecules of gene expression. In this special issue on RNA, seven minireviews illustrate how basic concepts and recent RNA biology findings are transformed into new and exciting RNA therapeutics.

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