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Mol. Cells 2007; 23(2): 132-137

Published online April 30, 2007

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

The Present Status of Cell Tracking Methods in Animal Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology

Daehong Kim, Kwan Soo Hong, Jihwan Song

Abstract

With the advance of stem cell transplantation research, in vivo cell tracking techniques have become increasingly important in recent years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a unique tool for non-invasive tracking of transplanted cells. Since the initial findings on the stem cell migration by MRI several years ago, there have been numerous studies using various animal models, notably in heart or brain disease models. In order to develop more reliable and clinically applicable methodologies, multiple aspects should be taken into consideration. In this review, we will summarize the current status and future perspectives of in vivo cell tracking technologies using MRI. In particular, use of different MR contrast agents and their detection methods using MRI will be described in much detail. In addition, various cell labeling methods to increase the sensitivity of signals will be extensively discussed. We will also review several key experiments, in which MRI techniques were utilized to detect the presence and/or migration of transplanted stem cells in various animal models. Finally, we will discuss the current problems and future directions of cell tracking methods using MRI.

Keywords Cell Tracking; Magnetic Resonance Imaging;, Stem Cell Therapy

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2007; 23(2): 132-137

Published online April 30, 2007

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The Present Status of Cell Tracking Methods in Animal Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology

Daehong Kim, Kwan Soo Hong, Jihwan Song

Abstract

With the advance of stem cell transplantation research, in vivo cell tracking techniques have become increasingly important in recent years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a unique tool for non-invasive tracking of transplanted cells. Since the initial findings on the stem cell migration by MRI several years ago, there have been numerous studies using various animal models, notably in heart or brain disease models. In order to develop more reliable and clinically applicable methodologies, multiple aspects should be taken into consideration. In this review, we will summarize the current status and future perspectives of in vivo cell tracking technologies using MRI. In particular, use of different MR contrast agents and their detection methods using MRI will be described in much detail. In addition, various cell labeling methods to increase the sensitivity of signals will be extensively discussed. We will also review several key experiments, in which MRI techniques were utilized to detect the presence and/or migration of transplanted stem cells in various animal models. Finally, we will discuss the current problems and future directions of cell tracking methods using MRI.

Keywords: Cell Tracking, Magnetic Resonance Imaging,, Stem Cell Therapy

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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Molecules and Cells

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