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Mol. Cells 2013; 36(6): 485-506

Published online December 31, 2013

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0333-1

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

New Tools and New Biology: Recent Miniaturized Systems for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Morgan Hamon, and Jong Wook Hong

1Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA, 2College of Pharmacy,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-741, Korea, 3Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791, Korea

Received: November 11, 2013; Accepted: November 14, 2013

Abstract

Recent advances in applied physics and chemistry have led to the development of novel microfluidic systems. Microfluidic systems allow minute amounts of reagents to be processed using μm-scale channels and offer several advantages over conventional analytical devices for use in biological sciences: faster, more accurate and more reproducible analytical performance, reduced cell and reagent consumption, portability, and integration of functional components in a single chip. In this review, we introduce how microfluidics has been applied to biological sciences. We first present an overview of the fabrication of microfluidic systems and describe the distinct technologies available for biological research. We then present examples of microsystems used in biological sciences, focusing on applications in molecular and cellular biology.

Keywords cellular biology, human-on-a-chip, microfluidics, molecular biology, organ-on-a-chip, worm-on-a-chip

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2013; 36(6): 485-506

Published online December 31, 2013 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0333-1

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

New Tools and New Biology: Recent Miniaturized Systems for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Morgan Hamon, and Jong Wook Hong

1Materials Research and Education Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA, 2College of Pharmacy,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-741, Korea, 3Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791, Korea

Received: November 11, 2013; Accepted: November 14, 2013

Abstract

Recent advances in applied physics and chemistry have led to the development of novel microfluidic systems. Microfluidic systems allow minute amounts of reagents to be processed using μm-scale channels and offer several advantages over conventional analytical devices for use in biological sciences: faster, more accurate and more reproducible analytical performance, reduced cell and reagent consumption, portability, and integration of functional components in a single chip. In this review, we introduce how microfluidics has been applied to biological sciences. We first present an overview of the fabrication of microfluidic systems and describe the distinct technologies available for biological research. We then present examples of microsystems used in biological sciences, focusing on applications in molecular and cellular biology.

Keywords: cellular biology, human-on-a-chip, microfluidics, molecular biology, organ-on-a-chip, worm-on-a-chip

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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