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Mol. Cells 2013; 36(6): 477-484

Published online December 31, 2013

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0304-6

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Recent Advances in Nanobiotechnology and High-Throughput Molecular Techniques for Systems Biomedicine

Eung-Sam Kim, Eun Hyun Ahn, Euiheon Chung, and Deok-Ho Kim

1Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 2Department of Medical System Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Korea, 3Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 4Institute of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA, 5School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Korea, 6Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA, 7These authors contributed equally to this work.

Received: October 17, 2014; Accepted: October 20, 2013

Abstract

Nanotechnology-based tools are beginning to emerge as promising platforms for quantitative high-throughput analysis of live cells and tissues. Despite unprecedented progress made over the last decade, a challenge still lies in integrating emerging nanotechnology-based tools into macroscopic biomedical apparatuses for practical purposes in biomedical sciences. In this review, we discuss the recent advances and limitations in the analysis and control of mechanical, biochemical, fluidic, and optical interactions in the interface areas of nanotechnologybased materials and living cells in both in vitro and in vivo settings.

Keywords bioimaging, microarray, microfluidics, nanomaterials, nanotechnology, next generation DNA sequencing, quantum dot

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2013; 36(6): 477-484

Published online December 31, 2013 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0304-6

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Recent Advances in Nanobiotechnology and High-Throughput Molecular Techniques for Systems Biomedicine

Eung-Sam Kim, Eun Hyun Ahn, Euiheon Chung, and Deok-Ho Kim

1Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 2Department of Medical System Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Korea, 3Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 4Institute of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA, 5School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Korea, 6Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA, 7These authors contributed equally to this work.

Received: October 17, 2014; Accepted: October 20, 2013

Abstract

Nanotechnology-based tools are beginning to emerge as promising platforms for quantitative high-throughput analysis of live cells and tissues. Despite unprecedented progress made over the last decade, a challenge still lies in integrating emerging nanotechnology-based tools into macroscopic biomedical apparatuses for practical purposes in biomedical sciences. In this review, we discuss the recent advances and limitations in the analysis and control of mechanical, biochemical, fluidic, and optical interactions in the interface areas of nanotechnologybased materials and living cells in both in vitro and in vivo settings.

Keywords: bioimaging, microarray, microfluidics, nanomaterials, nanotechnology, next generation DNA sequencing, quantum dot

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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