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Mol. Cells 2013; 36(4): 316-321

Published online October 31, 2013

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0093-y

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

The Effects of Adenoviral Transfection of the Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene on Epidermal Stem Cells: an In Vitro Study

Xinping Li, Ling Liang, Pin Zhao, Kenzo Uchida, Hisatoshi Baba, Hong Huang, Wenfang Bai, Liming Bai, and Mingsheng Zhang

1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Guangdong Geriatric Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510080, China, 2The First Clinical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China, 3Changsha Medical University, Changsha 410219, China, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Medicine, Fukui University Faculty of Medical Sciences, Eiheiji Matsuoka, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, 5School of Information, University of South Florida, USA

Received: March 22, 2013; Revised: July 22, 2013; Accepted: August 1, 2013

Abstract

Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are characterized as slow-cycling, multi-potent, and self-renewing cells that not only maintain somatic homeostasis but also participate in tissue regeneration and repair. To examine the feasibility of adenoviral vector-mediated keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene transfer into in vitro-expanded ESCs, ESCs were isolated from samples of human skin, cultured in vitro, and then transfected with recombinant adenovirus (Ad) carrying the human KGF gene (AdKGF) or green fluorescent protein gene (AdGFP). The effects of KGF gene transfer on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell surface antigen phenotype, and ?-catenin expression were investigated. Compared to ESCs transfected with AdGFP, AdKGF-transfected ESCs grew well, maintained a high proliferative capacity in keratinocyte serum-free medium, and expressed high levels of ?-catenin. AdKGF infection increa-sed the number of ESCs in the G0/G1 phase and promoted ESCs entry into the G2/M phase, but had no effect on cell surface antigen phenotype (CD49f+/CD71-). The results suggest that KGF gene transfer can stimulate ESCs to grow and undergo cell division, which can be applied to enhance cutaneous wound healing.

Keywords adenoviral vector, epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte growth factor

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2013; 36(4): 316-321

Published online October 31, 2013 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-013-0093-y

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The Effects of Adenoviral Transfection of the Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene on Epidermal Stem Cells: an In Vitro Study

Xinping Li, Ling Liang, Pin Zhao, Kenzo Uchida, Hisatoshi Baba, Hong Huang, Wenfang Bai, Liming Bai, and Mingsheng Zhang

1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Guangdong Geriatric Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences and Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510080, China, 2The First Clinical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China, 3Changsha Medical University, Changsha 410219, China, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Medicine, Fukui University Faculty of Medical Sciences, Eiheiji Matsuoka, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, 5School of Information, University of South Florida, USA

Received: March 22, 2013; Revised: July 22, 2013; Accepted: August 1, 2013

Abstract

Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are characterized as slow-cycling, multi-potent, and self-renewing cells that not only maintain somatic homeostasis but also participate in tissue regeneration and repair. To examine the feasibility of adenoviral vector-mediated keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene transfer into in vitro-expanded ESCs, ESCs were isolated from samples of human skin, cultured in vitro, and then transfected with recombinant adenovirus (Ad) carrying the human KGF gene (AdKGF) or green fluorescent protein gene (AdGFP). The effects of KGF gene transfer on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell surface antigen phenotype, and ?-catenin expression were investigated. Compared to ESCs transfected with AdGFP, AdKGF-transfected ESCs grew well, maintained a high proliferative capacity in keratinocyte serum-free medium, and expressed high levels of ?-catenin. AdKGF infection increa-sed the number of ESCs in the G0/G1 phase and promoted ESCs entry into the G2/M phase, but had no effect on cell surface antigen phenotype (CD49f+/CD71-). The results suggest that KGF gene transfer can stimulate ESCs to grow and undergo cell division, which can be applied to enhance cutaneous wound healing.

Keywords: adenoviral vector, epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte growth factor

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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