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Mol. Cells 2012; 34(3): 289-293

Published online September 30, 2012

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-0116-0

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Spatiotemporal Expression and Functional Implication of CXCL14 in the Developing Mice Cerebellum

Cho Rong Park1,4, Dong-Kyu Kim1,4, Eun Bee Cho1, Dong-Joo You1, Jean Luc do Rego2, David Vaudry2, Woong Sun3, Hyun Kim3, Jae Young Seong1, and Jong-Ik Hwang1,*

1Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705, Korea, 2Institut National de la Sant? et de la Recherche M?dicale (INSERM), Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine (IRIB), Regional Platform for Cell Imaging (PRIMACEN), International Associate Laboratory Samuel de Champlain, University of Rouen, France, 3Department of Anatomy, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705, Korea, 4These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: hjibio@korea.ac.kr

Received: April 17, 2012; Revised: June 14, 2012; Accepted: June 19, 2012

Abstract

Cerebellar granule neurons migrate from the external gra-nule cell layer (EGL) to the internal granule cell layer (IGL) during postnatal morphogenesis. This migration process through 4 different layers is a complex mecha-nism which is highly regulated by many secreted proteins. Although chemokines are well-known peptides that trigger cell migration, but with the exception of CXCL12, which is responsible for prenatal EGL formation, their functions have not been thoroughly studied in granule cell migration. In the present study, we examined cerebellar CXCL14 expression in neonatal and adult mice. CXCL14 mRNA was expressed at high levels in adult mouse cerebellum, but the protein was not detected. Nevertheless, Western blotting analysis revealed transient expression of CXCL14 in the cerebellum in early postnatal days (P1, P8), prior to the completion of granule cell migration. Looking at the distribution of CXCL14 by immunohistochemistry revealed a strong immune reactivity at the level of the Purkinje cell layer and molecular layer which was absent in the adult cerebellum. In functional assays, CXCL14 stimulated transwell migration of cultured granule cells and enhanced the spreading rate of neurons from EGL micro-explants. Taken together, these results revealed the transient expression of CXCL14 by Purkinje cells in the developing cerebellum and demonstrate the ability of the chemokine to stimulate granule cell migration, suggesting that it must be involved in the postnatal maturation of the cerebellum.

Keywords cerebellum, chemokine, CXCL14, granule cells, migration

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2012; 34(3): 289-293

Published online September 30, 2012 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-0116-0

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Spatiotemporal Expression and Functional Implication of CXCL14 in the Developing Mice Cerebellum

Cho Rong Park1,4, Dong-Kyu Kim1,4, Eun Bee Cho1, Dong-Joo You1, Jean Luc do Rego2, David Vaudry2, Woong Sun3, Hyun Kim3, Jae Young Seong1, and Jong-Ik Hwang1,*

1Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705, Korea, 2Institut National de la Sant? et de la Recherche M?dicale (INSERM), Institute for Research and Innovation in Biomedicine (IRIB), Regional Platform for Cell Imaging (PRIMACEN), International Associate Laboratory Samuel de Champlain, University of Rouen, France, 3Department of Anatomy, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705, Korea, 4These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: hjibio@korea.ac.kr

Received: April 17, 2012; Revised: June 14, 2012; Accepted: June 19, 2012

Abstract

Cerebellar granule neurons migrate from the external gra-nule cell layer (EGL) to the internal granule cell layer (IGL) during postnatal morphogenesis. This migration process through 4 different layers is a complex mecha-nism which is highly regulated by many secreted proteins. Although chemokines are well-known peptides that trigger cell migration, but with the exception of CXCL12, which is responsible for prenatal EGL formation, their functions have not been thoroughly studied in granule cell migration. In the present study, we examined cerebellar CXCL14 expression in neonatal and adult mice. CXCL14 mRNA was expressed at high levels in adult mouse cerebellum, but the protein was not detected. Nevertheless, Western blotting analysis revealed transient expression of CXCL14 in the cerebellum in early postnatal days (P1, P8), prior to the completion of granule cell migration. Looking at the distribution of CXCL14 by immunohistochemistry revealed a strong immune reactivity at the level of the Purkinje cell layer and molecular layer which was absent in the adult cerebellum. In functional assays, CXCL14 stimulated transwell migration of cultured granule cells and enhanced the spreading rate of neurons from EGL micro-explants. Taken together, these results revealed the transient expression of CXCL14 by Purkinje cells in the developing cerebellum and demonstrate the ability of the chemokine to stimulate granule cell migration, suggesting that it must be involved in the postnatal maturation of the cerebellum.

Keywords: cerebellum, chemokine, CXCL14, granule cells, migration

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.11, pp. 763~867
COVER PICTURE
Naive (cyan) and axotomized (magenta) retinal ganglion cell axons in Xenopus tropicalis (Choi et al., pp. 846-854).

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