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Mol. Cells 2012; 34(2): 201-208

Published online August 31, 2012

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-0142-y

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

MYC and PIM2 Co-Expression in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells Readily Establishes Permanent Myeloid Cell Lines That Can Induce Lethal Myeloid Sarcoma In Vivo

Su Hwa Jang, and Hee Yong Chung*

Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: hychung@hanyang.ac.kr

Received: May 22, 2012; Accepted: June 12, 2012

Abstract

The hematopoietic cell malignancy is one of the most prevalent type of cancer and the disease has multiple pathologic molecular signatures. Research on the origin of hematopoietic cancer stem cells and the mode of subsequent maintenance and differentiation needs robust animal models that can reproduce the transformation and differentiation event in vivo. Here, we show that co-trans-duction of MYC and PIM2 proto-oncogenes into mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo. Unlike the previous doubly transgenic mouse model in which co-expression of MYC and PIM2 transgenes exclusively induced B cell lymphoma, we were able to show that the same combination of genes can also transform primary bone marrow myeloid cells in vitro resulting in permanent cell lines which induce myeloid sarcoma upon in vivo transplantation. By inducing cancerous transformation of fresh bone marrow cells in a controlled environment, the model we established will be useful for detailed study of the molecular events involved in initial transformation process of primary myeloid bone marrow cells and provides a model that can give insight to the molecular pathologic characteristics of human myeloid sarcoma, a rare presentation of solid tumors of undifferentiated myeloid blast cells associated with various types of myeloid leukemia.

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2012; 34(2): 201-208

Published online August 31, 2012 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-0142-y

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

MYC and PIM2 Co-Expression in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells Readily Establishes Permanent Myeloid Cell Lines That Can Induce Lethal Myeloid Sarcoma In Vivo

Su Hwa Jang, and Hee Yong Chung*

Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: hychung@hanyang.ac.kr

Received: May 22, 2012; Accepted: June 12, 2012

Abstract

The hematopoietic cell malignancy is one of the most prevalent type of cancer and the disease has multiple pathologic molecular signatures. Research on the origin of hematopoietic cancer stem cells and the mode of subsequent maintenance and differentiation needs robust animal models that can reproduce the transformation and differentiation event in vivo. Here, we show that co-trans-duction of MYC and PIM2 proto-oncogenes into mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo. Unlike the previous doubly transgenic mouse model in which co-expression of MYC and PIM2 transgenes exclusively induced B cell lymphoma, we were able to show that the same combination of genes can also transform primary bone marrow myeloid cells in vitro resulting in permanent cell lines which induce myeloid sarcoma upon in vivo transplantation. By inducing cancerous transformation of fresh bone marrow cells in a controlled environment, the model we established will be useful for detailed study of the molecular events involved in initial transformation process of primary myeloid bone marrow cells and provides a model that can give insight to the molecular pathologic characteristics of human myeloid sarcoma, a rare presentation of solid tumors of undifferentiated myeloid blast cells associated with various types of myeloid leukemia.

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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