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Mol. Cells 2012; 33(1): 35-41

Published online January 31, 2012

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-2181-9

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Orosomucoid Serum Concentrations and Fat Depot-Specific mRNA and Protein Expression in Humans

Assim A Alfadda1,2,3,*, Sumbul Fatma1,4, M Azhar Chishti1,3,4, Mohammed Y Al-Naami5, Ruba Elawad1, Carmen Deanna O Mendoza1,4, Hyunsun Jo6, and Yun Sok Lee7

1Obesity Research Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 2Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 3Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, College of Science, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 4Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 6School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 7Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: aalfadda@ksu.edu.sa

Received: September 1, 2011; Revised: November 9, 2011; Accepted: November 14, 2011

Abstract

Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflamma-tion, which contributes to systemic metabolic irregularities and obesity-linked metabolic disorders. Orosomucoid (ORM), an acute phase reactant protein, was shown to be produced in response to metabolic and inflammatory signals in the adipose tissue of obese mice, which protects them from severe inflammation and subsequent metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we examined whether there are site-specific differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT, respectively) ORM gene and protein expression from individuals with a wide range of obesity and the relationship between expressed and circulating ORM levels and measures of adiposity, insulin resistance, and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers and adipokines. The level of circulating ORM correlated positively with BMI, body fat mass, and serum leptin. It also correlated with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR values and C-reactive protein in men. There were no site-specific differences in ORM mRNA and protein expression between VAT and SAT, nor did we find a relationship between circulating ORM levels and its mRNA expression in either fat depot. We found that ORM mRNA expression correlated with mRNA expression of TNF-?, IL-6, and adiponectin in VAT, and with TNF-? and adiponectin in SAT. These observations are the first description linking adipose tissue ORM and pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules in humans. The close links of ORM and measures of adiposity, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue inflammation in humans reinforce previous experimental data and warrant further studies to explore a possible role of ORM in the patho-genesis of obesity-associated metabolic derangements.

Keywords adipokines, obesity, orosomucoid, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2012; 33(1): 35-41

Published online January 31, 2012 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-012-2181-9

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Orosomucoid Serum Concentrations and Fat Depot-Specific mRNA and Protein Expression in Humans

Assim A Alfadda1,2,3,*, Sumbul Fatma1,4, M Azhar Chishti1,3,4, Mohammed Y Al-Naami5, Ruba Elawad1, Carmen Deanna O Mendoza1,4, Hyunsun Jo6, and Yun Sok Lee7

1Obesity Research Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 2Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 3Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, College of Science, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 4Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, 6School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 7Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: aalfadda@ksu.edu.sa

Received: September 1, 2011; Revised: November 9, 2011; Accepted: November 14, 2011

Abstract

Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflamma-tion, which contributes to systemic metabolic irregularities and obesity-linked metabolic disorders. Orosomucoid (ORM), an acute phase reactant protein, was shown to be produced in response to metabolic and inflammatory signals in the adipose tissue of obese mice, which protects them from severe inflammation and subsequent metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we examined whether there are site-specific differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT, respectively) ORM gene and protein expression from individuals with a wide range of obesity and the relationship between expressed and circulating ORM levels and measures of adiposity, insulin resistance, and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers and adipokines. The level of circulating ORM correlated positively with BMI, body fat mass, and serum leptin. It also correlated with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR values and C-reactive protein in men. There were no site-specific differences in ORM mRNA and protein expression between VAT and SAT, nor did we find a relationship between circulating ORM levels and its mRNA expression in either fat depot. We found that ORM mRNA expression correlated with mRNA expression of TNF-?, IL-6, and adiponectin in VAT, and with TNF-? and adiponectin in SAT. These observations are the first description linking adipose tissue ORM and pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules in humans. The close links of ORM and measures of adiposity, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue inflammation in humans reinforce previous experimental data and warrant further studies to explore a possible role of ORM in the patho-genesis of obesity-associated metabolic derangements.

Keywords: adipokines, obesity, orosomucoid, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat

Mol. Cells
Jan 31, 2023 Vol.46 No.1, pp. 1~67
COVER PICTURE
RNAs form diverse shapes and play multiple functions as central molecules of gene expression. In this special issue on RNA, seven minireviews illustrate how basic concepts and recent RNA biology findings are transformed into new and exciting RNA therapeutics.

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