Hee Jin Park" /> Hee Jin Park, Woe-Yeon Kim, Hyeong Cheol Park, Sang Yeol Lee, Hans J. Bohnert, and Dae-Jin Yun*

" /> Hee Jin Park, Woe-Yeon Kim, Hyeong Cheol Park, Sang Yeol Lee, Hans J. Bohnert, and Dae-Jin Yun*

. Mol. Cells 2011;32:305-16. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0122-7">
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Mol. Cells 2011; 32(4): 305-316

Published online October 31, 2011

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0122-7

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

SUMO and SUMOylation in Plants

Hee Jin Park1, Woe-Yeon Kim1, Hyeong Cheol Park1, Sang Yeol Lee1, Hans J. Bohnert1,2, and Dae-Jin Yun1,*

1Division of Applied Life Science (Brain Korea 21 Program), and Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea, 2Departments of Plant Biology and of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: djyun@gnu.ac.kr

Received: June 10, 2011; Revised: August 29, 2011; Accepted: August 30, 2011

Abstract

The traditional focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, from gene through RNA to protein, has now been replaced by the recognition of an additional mechanism. The new regulatory mechanism, post-translational modifications to proteins, can actively alter protein function or activity introducing additional levels of functional complexity by altering cellular and sub-cellular location, protein interactions and the outcome of biochemical reaction chains. Modifications by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers systems are conserved in all eukaryotic organisms. One of them, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is present in plants. The SUMO mechanism includes several isoforms of proteins that are involved in reactions of sumoylation and de-sumoylation. Sumoylation affects several important processes in plants. Outstanding among those are responses to environmental stresses. These may be abiotic stresses, such as phosphate deficiency, heat, low temperature, and drought, or biotic stressses, as well including de-fense reactions to pathogen infection. Also, the regula-tions of flowering time, cell growth and develop-ment, and nitrogen assimilation have recently been added to this list. Identification of SUMO targets is material to characterize the function of sumoylation or desumoylation. Affinity purification and mass spectrometric identification have been done lately in plants. Further SUMO non-covalent binding appears to have function in other model organisms and SUMO interacting proteins in plants will be of interest to plant biologists who dissect the dynamic function of SUMO. This review will discuss results of recent insights into the role of sumoylation in plants.

Keywords Arabidopsis, SUMO, sumoylation

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2011; 32(4): 305-316

Published online October 31, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-0122-7

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

SUMO and SUMOylation in Plants

Hee Jin Park1, Woe-Yeon Kim1, Hyeong Cheol Park1, Sang Yeol Lee1, Hans J. Bohnert1,2, and Dae-Jin Yun1,*

1Division of Applied Life Science (Brain Korea 21 Program), and Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea, 2Departments of Plant Biology and of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: djyun@gnu.ac.kr

Received: June 10, 2011; Revised: August 29, 2011; Accepted: August 30, 2011

Abstract

The traditional focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, from gene through RNA to protein, has now been replaced by the recognition of an additional mechanism. The new regulatory mechanism, post-translational modifications to proteins, can actively alter protein function or activity introducing additional levels of functional complexity by altering cellular and sub-cellular location, protein interactions and the outcome of biochemical reaction chains. Modifications by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers systems are conserved in all eukaryotic organisms. One of them, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is present in plants. The SUMO mechanism includes several isoforms of proteins that are involved in reactions of sumoylation and de-sumoylation. Sumoylation affects several important processes in plants. Outstanding among those are responses to environmental stresses. These may be abiotic stresses, such as phosphate deficiency, heat, low temperature, and drought, or biotic stressses, as well including de-fense reactions to pathogen infection. Also, the regula-tions of flowering time, cell growth and develop-ment, and nitrogen assimilation have recently been added to this list. Identification of SUMO targets is material to characterize the function of sumoylation or desumoylation. Affinity purification and mass spectrometric identification have been done lately in plants. Further SUMO non-covalent binding appears to have function in other model organisms and SUMO interacting proteins in plants will be of interest to plant biologists who dissect the dynamic function of SUMO. This review will discuss results of recent insights into the role of sumoylation in plants.

Keywords: Arabidopsis, SUMO, sumoylation

Mol. Cells
Jul 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.7, pp. 435~512
COVER PICTURE
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells capable of differentiating into mesodermal lineages like adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic. Alcian blue-positive extracellular matrix secreted by chondrocytes in the lacuna confirmed the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs (Bashyal et al., pp. 479-494).

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