Kyung-Jin Cho" /> Kyung-Jin Cho, Ji-Min Seo, and Jae-Hong Kim*" /> Kyung-Jin Cho, Ji-Min Seo, and Jae-Hong Kim*. Mol. Cells 2011;32:1-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-1021-7">
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Mol. Cells 2011; 32(1): 1-5

Published online July 31, 2011

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-1021-7

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Bioactive Lipoxygenase Metabolites Stimulation of NADPH Oxidases and Reactive Oxygen Species

Kyung-Jin Cho1, Ji-Min Seo1, and Jae-Hong Kim*

College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Korea, 1These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: jhongkim@korea.ac.kr

Received: February 2, 2011; Accepted: February 22, 2011

Abstract

In mammalian cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via a variety of cellular oxidative processes, including the activity of NADPH oxidases (NOX), the acti-vity of xanthine oxidases, the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by lipoxygenases (LOX) and cyclooxygenases (COX), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Although NOX-generated ROS are the best characterized examples of ROS in mammalian cells, ROS are also generated by the oxidative metabolism (e.g., via LOX and COX) of AA that is released from the membrane phospholipids via the activity of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Recently, growing evidence suggests that LOX- and COX-generated AA metabolites can induce ROS generation by stimulating NOX and that a potential signaling connection exits between the LOX/COX metabolites and NOX. In this review, we discuss the results of recent studies that report the generation of ROS by LOX metabolites, especially 5-LOX metabolites, via NOX stimulation. In particular, we have focused on the contribution of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent bioactive eicosanoid that is derived from 5-LOX, and its receptors, BLT1 and BLT2, to NOX stimulation through a signaling mechanism that leads to ROS generation.

Keywords BLT2, eicosanoids, lipoxygenase, NOX, ROS

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2011; 32(1): 1-5

Published online July 31, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-011-1021-7

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Bioactive Lipoxygenase Metabolites Stimulation of NADPH Oxidases and Reactive Oxygen Species

Kyung-Jin Cho1, Ji-Min Seo1, and Jae-Hong Kim*

College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Korea, 1These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: jhongkim@korea.ac.kr

Received: February 2, 2011; Accepted: February 22, 2011

Abstract

In mammalian cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via a variety of cellular oxidative processes, including the activity of NADPH oxidases (NOX), the acti-vity of xanthine oxidases, the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by lipoxygenases (LOX) and cyclooxygenases (COX), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Although NOX-generated ROS are the best characterized examples of ROS in mammalian cells, ROS are also generated by the oxidative metabolism (e.g., via LOX and COX) of AA that is released from the membrane phospholipids via the activity of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Recently, growing evidence suggests that LOX- and COX-generated AA metabolites can induce ROS generation by stimulating NOX and that a potential signaling connection exits between the LOX/COX metabolites and NOX. In this review, we discuss the results of recent studies that report the generation of ROS by LOX metabolites, especially 5-LOX metabolites, via NOX stimulation. In particular, we have focused on the contribution of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent bioactive eicosanoid that is derived from 5-LOX, and its receptors, BLT1 and BLT2, to NOX stimulation through a signaling mechanism that leads to ROS generation.

Keywords: BLT2, eicosanoids, lipoxygenase, NOX, ROS

Mol. Cells
Aug 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.8, pp. 513~602
COVER PICTURE
Cryo-EM structure of human porphyrin transporter ABCB6 (main figure) shows that binding of hemin (inset, magenta) in concert with two glutathione molecules (cyan) primes ABCB6 for high ATP turnover (Kim et al., pp. 575-587).

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