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Mol. Cells 2010; 30(6): 519-526

Published online December 31, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0142-8

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Intracellular Degradation of Fusobacterium nucleatum in Human Gingival Epithelial Cells

Suk Ji1, Ji Eun Shin, Yong Cheol Kim, and Youngnim Choi*

Department of Oromaxillofacial Infection and Immunity, Brain Korea 21 CLS, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749, Korea, 1Present address: Department of Periodontology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul 136-705, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: youngnim@snu.ac.kr

Received: June 14, 2010; Revised: August 19, 2010; Accepted: August 30, 2010

Abstract

The role of Fusobacterium nucleatum in oral health and disease is controversial. We have previously shown that F. nucleatum invades gingival epithelial cells. However, the destiny of the internalized F. nucleatum is not clear. In the present study, the intracellular destiny of F. nucleatum and its cytopathic effect on gingival epithelial cells were studied. The ability of F. nucleatum and seven other oral bacterial species to invade immortalized human gingival epithelial (HOK-16B) cells were compared by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. F. nucleatum had the highest invasive capacity, comparable to that of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen. Confocal microscopic examination revealed colocalization of internalized F. nucleatum with endosomes and lysosomes. Examination by transmission electron microscopy revealed that most intracellular F. nucleatum was located within vesicular structures with single enclosed membranes. Furthermore, F. nucleatum could not survive within gingival epithelial cells and had no cytopathic effects on host cells. Interes-tingly, endosomal maturation played a role in induction of the antimicrobial peptides human beta defensin (HBD)-2 and -3 by F. nucleatum from gingival epithelial cells. F. nucleatum is destined to enter an endocytic degradation pathway after invasion and has no cytopathic effect on gingival epithelial cells, which may cast new light on the role of F. nucleatum in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

Keywords endosomes, Fusobacterium nucleatum, gingival epithelium, invasion, lysosomes

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 30(6): 519-526

Published online December 31, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0142-8

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Intracellular Degradation of Fusobacterium nucleatum in Human Gingival Epithelial Cells

Suk Ji1, Ji Eun Shin, Yong Cheol Kim, and Youngnim Choi*

Department of Oromaxillofacial Infection and Immunity, Brain Korea 21 CLS, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749, Korea, 1Present address: Department of Periodontology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul 136-705, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: youngnim@snu.ac.kr

Received: June 14, 2010; Revised: August 19, 2010; Accepted: August 30, 2010

Abstract

The role of Fusobacterium nucleatum in oral health and disease is controversial. We have previously shown that F. nucleatum invades gingival epithelial cells. However, the destiny of the internalized F. nucleatum is not clear. In the present study, the intracellular destiny of F. nucleatum and its cytopathic effect on gingival epithelial cells were studied. The ability of F. nucleatum and seven other oral bacterial species to invade immortalized human gingival epithelial (HOK-16B) cells were compared by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. F. nucleatum had the highest invasive capacity, comparable to that of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen. Confocal microscopic examination revealed colocalization of internalized F. nucleatum with endosomes and lysosomes. Examination by transmission electron microscopy revealed that most intracellular F. nucleatum was located within vesicular structures with single enclosed membranes. Furthermore, F. nucleatum could not survive within gingival epithelial cells and had no cytopathic effects on host cells. Interes-tingly, endosomal maturation played a role in induction of the antimicrobial peptides human beta defensin (HBD)-2 and -3 by F. nucleatum from gingival epithelial cells. F. nucleatum is destined to enter an endocytic degradation pathway after invasion and has no cytopathic effect on gingival epithelial cells, which may cast new light on the role of F. nucleatum in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

Keywords: endosomes, Fusobacterium nucleatum, gingival epithelium, invasion, lysosomes

Mol. Cells
Aug 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.8, pp. 513~602
COVER PICTURE
Cryo-EM structure of human porphyrin transporter ABCB6 (main figure) shows that binding of hemin (inset, magenta) in concert with two glutathione molecules (cyan) primes ABCB6 for high ATP turnover (Kim et al., pp. 575-587).

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