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Mol. Cells 2010; 30(3): 271-277

Published online September 30, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0114-z

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Overexpression of the Ethylene-Responsive Factor Gene BrERF4 from Brassica rapa Increases Tolerance to Salt and Drought in Arabidopsis Plants

Yean Joo Seo, Jong-Beum Park, Yeon-Jeong Cho, Choonkyun Jung1, Hak Soo Seo2,3, Soon-Ki Park, Baek Hie Nahm4, and Jong Tae Song*

School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea, 1School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 2Department of Plant Bioscience, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 3Bio-MAX Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-818, Korea, 4Division of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Myongji University, Yongin 449-728, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: jtsong68@knu.ac.kr

Received: May 14, 2010; Revised: June 11, 2010; Accepted: June 14, 2010

Abstract

Ethylene-responsive factors (ERFs), within a subgroup of the AP2/ERF transcription factor family, are involved in diverse plant reactions to biotic or abiotic stresses. Here, we report that overexpression of an ERF gene from Bras-sica rapa ssp. pekinensis (BrERF4) led to improved toler-ance to salt and drought stresses in Arabidopsis. It also significantly affected the growth and development of transgenic plants. We detected that salt-induced expres-sions of a transcriptional repressor gene, AtERF4, and some Ser/Thr protein phosphatase2C genes, ABI1, ABI2 and AtPP2CA, were suppressed in BrERF4-overexpres-sing Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, BrERF4 was in-duced by treatment with ethylene or methyljasmonate, but not by abscisic acid or NaCl in B. rapa. These results suggest that BrERF4 is activated through a network of different signaling pathways in response to salinity and drought.

Keywords Brassica rapa (B. rapa), drought stress, ethylene-responsive factor (ERF), salt stress, transcriptional regulator

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 30(3): 271-277

Published online September 30, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0114-z

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Overexpression of the Ethylene-Responsive Factor Gene BrERF4 from Brassica rapa Increases Tolerance to Salt and Drought in Arabidopsis Plants

Yean Joo Seo, Jong-Beum Park, Yeon-Jeong Cho, Choonkyun Jung1, Hak Soo Seo2,3, Soon-Ki Park, Baek Hie Nahm4, and Jong Tae Song*

School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea, 1School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 2Department of Plant Bioscience, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, 3Bio-MAX Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-818, Korea, 4Division of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Myongji University, Yongin 449-728, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: jtsong68@knu.ac.kr

Received: May 14, 2010; Revised: June 11, 2010; Accepted: June 14, 2010

Abstract

Ethylene-responsive factors (ERFs), within a subgroup of the AP2/ERF transcription factor family, are involved in diverse plant reactions to biotic or abiotic stresses. Here, we report that overexpression of an ERF gene from Bras-sica rapa ssp. pekinensis (BrERF4) led to improved toler-ance to salt and drought stresses in Arabidopsis. It also significantly affected the growth and development of transgenic plants. We detected that salt-induced expres-sions of a transcriptional repressor gene, AtERF4, and some Ser/Thr protein phosphatase2C genes, ABI1, ABI2 and AtPP2CA, were suppressed in BrERF4-overexpres-sing Arabidopsis plants. Furthermore, BrERF4 was in-duced by treatment with ethylene or methyljasmonate, but not by abscisic acid or NaCl in B. rapa. These results suggest that BrERF4 is activated through a network of different signaling pathways in response to salinity and drought.

Keywords: Brassica rapa (B. rapa), drought stress, ethylene-responsive factor (ERF), salt stress, transcriptional regulator

Mol. Cells
Aug 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.8, pp. 513~602
COVER PICTURE
Cryo-EM structure of human porphyrin transporter ABCB6 (main figure) shows that binding of hemin (inset, magenta) in concert with two glutathione molecules (cyan) primes ABCB6 for high ATP turnover (Kim et al., pp. 575-587).

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