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Mol. Cells 2010; 30(4): 355-362

Published online October 31, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0134-8

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

c-Myc Stimulates Cell Invasion by Inhibiting FBX8 Function

Hyun Jung Cho, Yun Jeong Oh, Junhye Kwon1, Jae Young Kwon, Kyung-Soo Kim2, and Hongtae Kim*

Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea, 1Department of Biological Sciences, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742, Korea, 2Department of Family Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul 137-040, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: khtcat@skku.edu

Received: April 15, 2010; Revised: August 2, 2010; Accepted: August 12, 2010

Abstract

c-Myc is a cellular onco-protein and a transcriptional activator important for cell growth, cell division, and tumorigenesis. Despite all that is known of its function, the mechanism of how c-Myc contributes to tumorigenesis is unclear. To gain insight into the mechanism through which c-Myc protein exerts its oncogenic activity, we performed large-scale, tandem repeat affinity purification and identified the F box only protein 8 (FBX8), an F-box and Sec7 domain-containing protein, as a novel Myc-binding protein. The c-Myc/FBX8 interaction was mediated by the c-Myc box II (MBII) region. We also confirmed that Myc protein overexpression in 293T cells affected FBX8 cellular trans-location and led to recovery from FBX8-mediated inhibi-tion of ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) function during cell invasion. Together, these results suggest that FBX8 is a novel c-Myc binding protein and that c-Myc induces cell invasive activity through the inhibition of FBX8 effects on ARF6 function during cell invasion.

Keywords c-Myc, cell invasion, FBX8, tumorigenesis, ubiquitination

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 30(4): 355-362

Published online October 31, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0134-8

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

c-Myc Stimulates Cell Invasion by Inhibiting FBX8 Function

Hyun Jung Cho, Yun Jeong Oh, Junhye Kwon1, Jae Young Kwon, Kyung-Soo Kim2, and Hongtae Kim*

Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea, 1Department of Biological Sciences, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742, Korea, 2Department of Family Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul 137-040, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: khtcat@skku.edu

Received: April 15, 2010; Revised: August 2, 2010; Accepted: August 12, 2010

Abstract

c-Myc is a cellular onco-protein and a transcriptional activator important for cell growth, cell division, and tumorigenesis. Despite all that is known of its function, the mechanism of how c-Myc contributes to tumorigenesis is unclear. To gain insight into the mechanism through which c-Myc protein exerts its oncogenic activity, we performed large-scale, tandem repeat affinity purification and identified the F box only protein 8 (FBX8), an F-box and Sec7 domain-containing protein, as a novel Myc-binding protein. The c-Myc/FBX8 interaction was mediated by the c-Myc box II (MBII) region. We also confirmed that Myc protein overexpression in 293T cells affected FBX8 cellular trans-location and led to recovery from FBX8-mediated inhibi-tion of ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) function during cell invasion. Together, these results suggest that FBX8 is a novel c-Myc binding protein and that c-Myc induces cell invasive activity through the inhibition of FBX8 effects on ARF6 function during cell invasion.

Keywords: c-Myc, cell invasion, FBX8, tumorigenesis, ubiquitination

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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