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Mol. Cells 2010; 30(2): 161-165

Published online August 31, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0102-3

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Acute Stress Responsive RGS Proteins in the Mouse Brain

Gyeongwha Kim1, Younghyurk Lee1, Eun Young Jeong, Soonwoong Jung, Hyeonwi Son,Dong Hoon Lee, Gu Seob Roh, Sang Soo Kang, Gyeong Jae Cho, Wan Sung Choi, and Hyun Joon Kim*

Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-751, Korea, 1These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: kimhj@gnu.kr

Received: April 15, 2010; Revised: May 20, 2010; Accepted: May 25, 2010

Abstract

Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins play an important role in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling and the activity of some GPCRs is modulated via RGS protein levels during stress response. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in RGS protein mRNA expressions in the mouse brain after 2h restraint stress. The mRNA level of 19 RGS proteins was analyzed using real-time PCR in six brain regions, which included the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum, and pituitary gland, from control and stressed mouse. We found that the level of mRNA of each RGS varied according to brain region and that two to eight RGS proteins exhibited changes in mRNA levels in each brain region by restraint stress. It was also revealed that RGS4 protein amount was consistent with mRNA level, indicating RGS4 protein may have regulatory roles in the acute stress response.

Keywords acute stress, G-PCR, G-protein signaling, RGS protein, stress response

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 30(2): 161-165

Published online August 31, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0102-3

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Acute Stress Responsive RGS Proteins in the Mouse Brain

Gyeongwha Kim1, Younghyurk Lee1, Eun Young Jeong, Soonwoong Jung, Hyeonwi Son,Dong Hoon Lee, Gu Seob Roh, Sang Soo Kang, Gyeong Jae Cho, Wan Sung Choi, and Hyun Joon Kim*

Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-751, Korea, 1These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: kimhj@gnu.kr

Received: April 15, 2010; Revised: May 20, 2010; Accepted: May 25, 2010

Abstract

Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins play an important role in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling and the activity of some GPCRs is modulated via RGS protein levels during stress response. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in RGS protein mRNA expressions in the mouse brain after 2h restraint stress. The mRNA level of 19 RGS proteins was analyzed using real-time PCR in six brain regions, which included the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum, and pituitary gland, from control and stressed mouse. We found that the level of mRNA of each RGS varied according to brain region and that two to eight RGS proteins exhibited changes in mRNA levels in each brain region by restraint stress. It was also revealed that RGS4 protein amount was consistent with mRNA level, indicating RGS4 protein may have regulatory roles in the acute stress response.

Keywords: acute stress, G-PCR, G-protein signaling, RGS protein, stress response

Mol. Cells
May 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.5, pp. 273~352
COVER PICTURE
Fe2+ ion depletion-induced expression of BΔGFP at the early stage of leaf development (Choi et al., pp. 294-305).

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