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Mol. Cells 2010; 29(5): 493-499

Published online May 31, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0061-8

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Establishment of a Resource Population of SLA Haplotype-Defined Korean Native Pigs

Han-Ok Cho1, Chak-Sum Ho2,6, Yu-Joo Lee1, In-Cheol Cho3, Sung-Soo Lee3, Moon-Suck Ko3,Chankyu Park4, Douglas M. Smith2,7, Jin-Tae Jeon5, and Jun-Heon Lee1,*

1Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea, 2Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA, 3Subtropical Animal Experiment Station, National Institute of Animal Science, Jeju 690-150, Korea, 4Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea, 5Division of Applied Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea, 6Present address: Histocompatibility Laboratory, Gift of Life Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA, 7Present address: 4114 Timber Ridge Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: junheon@cnu.ac.kr

Received: November 23, 2010; Revised: January 26, 2010; Accepted: January 29, 2010

Abstract

The highly polymorphic porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or the swine leukocyte antigens (SLA), has been repeatedly associated with variations in swine immune response to pathogens and vaccines as well as with production traits. The SLA antigens are also impor-tant targets for immunological recognition of foreign tissue grafts. We recently established a resource population of Korean native pigs as models for human transplantation and xenotransplantation research. In this study, 115 animals derived from three generations of the Korean native pigs were genotyped for three SLA class I (SLA-2, SLA-3 and SLA-1) and three SLA class II loci (DRB1, DQB1, DQA) using PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) at the allele group resolution. A total of seven SLA haplotypes (Lr-5.34, Lr-7.23, Lr-31.13, Lr-56.23, Lr-56.30, Lr-59.1, Lr-65.34), comprising six unique class I and five unique class II haplotypes, were characterized in the founding animals. Class I haplotype Lr-65.0 and class II haplotype Lr-0.34 were novel; and together with Lr-56.0 these haplotypes appeared to be breed-specific. In the progeny population, Lr-7.23 and Lr-56.30 appeared to be the most prevalent haplotypes with frequencies of 34.7% and 31.6%, respectively; the overall homozygosity was 27.4%. This resource population of SLA-defined Korean native pigs will be useful as large animal models for various transplantation and xenotransplantation experiments, as well as for dissecting the roles of SLA proteins in swine disease resistance and production traits.

Keywords genotyping, Korean native pigs, PCR-SSP, SLA haplotype, swine leukocyte antigen

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 29(5): 493-499

Published online May 31, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0061-8

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Establishment of a Resource Population of SLA Haplotype-Defined Korean Native Pigs

Han-Ok Cho1, Chak-Sum Ho2,6, Yu-Joo Lee1, In-Cheol Cho3, Sung-Soo Lee3, Moon-Suck Ko3,Chankyu Park4, Douglas M. Smith2,7, Jin-Tae Jeon5, and Jun-Heon Lee1,*

1Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea, 2Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA, 3Subtropical Animal Experiment Station, National Institute of Animal Science, Jeju 690-150, Korea, 4Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea, 5Division of Applied Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea, 6Present address: Histocompatibility Laboratory, Gift of Life Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA, 7Present address: 4114 Timber Ridge Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: junheon@cnu.ac.kr

Received: November 23, 2010; Revised: January 26, 2010; Accepted: January 29, 2010

Abstract

The highly polymorphic porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or the swine leukocyte antigens (SLA), has been repeatedly associated with variations in swine immune response to pathogens and vaccines as well as with production traits. The SLA antigens are also impor-tant targets for immunological recognition of foreign tissue grafts. We recently established a resource population of Korean native pigs as models for human transplantation and xenotransplantation research. In this study, 115 animals derived from three generations of the Korean native pigs were genotyped for three SLA class I (SLA-2, SLA-3 and SLA-1) and three SLA class II loci (DRB1, DQB1, DQA) using PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) at the allele group resolution. A total of seven SLA haplotypes (Lr-5.34, Lr-7.23, Lr-31.13, Lr-56.23, Lr-56.30, Lr-59.1, Lr-65.34), comprising six unique class I and five unique class II haplotypes, were characterized in the founding animals. Class I haplotype Lr-65.0 and class II haplotype Lr-0.34 were novel; and together with Lr-56.0 these haplotypes appeared to be breed-specific. In the progeny population, Lr-7.23 and Lr-56.30 appeared to be the most prevalent haplotypes with frequencies of 34.7% and 31.6%, respectively; the overall homozygosity was 27.4%. This resource population of SLA-defined Korean native pigs will be useful as large animal models for various transplantation and xenotransplantation experiments, as well as for dissecting the roles of SLA proteins in swine disease resistance and production traits.

Keywords: genotyping, Korean native pigs, PCR-SSP, SLA haplotype, swine leukocyte antigen

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.11, pp. 763~867
COVER PICTURE
Naive (cyan) and axotomized (magenta) retinal ganglion cell axons in Xenopus tropicalis (Choi et al., pp. 846-854).

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