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Mol. Cells 2010; 29(2): 153-158

Published online February 28, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0019-x

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Biosynthesis of Dihydrochalcomycin:Characterization of a Deoxyallosyltransferase(gerGTI)

Binod Babu Pageni, Dinesh Simkhada, Tae-Jin Oh, and Jae Kyung Sohng*

Institute of Biomolecule Reconstruction, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 336-708, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: sohng@sunmoon.ac.kr

Received: August 17, 2009; Revised: October 20, 2009; Accepted: October 28, 2009

Abstract

Through an inactivation experiment followed by comple-mentation, the gerGTII gene was previously character-ized as a chalcosyltransferase gene involved in the biosynthesis of dihydochalcomycin. The glycosyltrans-ferase gerGTI was identified as a deoxyallosyltransferase required for the glycosylation of D-mycinose sugar. This 6-deoxyhexose sugar was converted to mycinose, via bis-O-methylation, following attachment to the polyketide lactone during dihydrochalcomycin biosynthesis. Gene sequence alignment of gerGTI to several glycosyltransferases revealed a consensus se-quence motif that appears to be characteristic of the enzymes in this sub-group of the glycosyltransferase family. To characterize its putative function, genetic disruption of gerGTI in the wild-type strain Streptomyces sp. KCTC 0041BP and in the gerGTII-deleted mutant (S. sp. ΔgerGTII), as well as complementation of gerGTII in S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI, were carried out, and the products were analyzed by LC/MS. S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI mutant produced dihydrochalconolide macrolide. S. sp. ΔgerGTI and S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI complementation of gerGTII yielded dihydrochalconolide without the mycinose sugar. The intermediate shows that gerGTI encodes a de-oxyallosyltransferase that acts after gerGTII.

Keywords biosynthesis, glycosyltransferase, macrolide, Streptomyces

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 29(2): 153-158

Published online February 28, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0019-x

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Biosynthesis of Dihydrochalcomycin:Characterization of a Deoxyallosyltransferase(gerGTI)

Binod Babu Pageni, Dinesh Simkhada, Tae-Jin Oh, and Jae Kyung Sohng*

Institute of Biomolecule Reconstruction, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 336-708, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: sohng@sunmoon.ac.kr

Received: August 17, 2009; Revised: October 20, 2009; Accepted: October 28, 2009

Abstract

Through an inactivation experiment followed by comple-mentation, the gerGTII gene was previously character-ized as a chalcosyltransferase gene involved in the biosynthesis of dihydochalcomycin. The glycosyltrans-ferase gerGTI was identified as a deoxyallosyltransferase required for the glycosylation of D-mycinose sugar. This 6-deoxyhexose sugar was converted to mycinose, via bis-O-methylation, following attachment to the polyketide lactone during dihydrochalcomycin biosynthesis. Gene sequence alignment of gerGTI to several glycosyltransferases revealed a consensus se-quence motif that appears to be characteristic of the enzymes in this sub-group of the glycosyltransferase family. To characterize its putative function, genetic disruption of gerGTI in the wild-type strain Streptomyces sp. KCTC 0041BP and in the gerGTII-deleted mutant (S. sp. ΔgerGTII), as well as complementation of gerGTII in S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI, were carried out, and the products were analyzed by LC/MS. S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI mutant produced dihydrochalconolide macrolide. S. sp. ΔgerGTI and S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI complementation of gerGTII yielded dihydrochalconolide without the mycinose sugar. The intermediate shows that gerGTI encodes a de-oxyallosyltransferase that acts after gerGTII.

Keywords: biosynthesis, glycosyltransferase, macrolide, Streptomyces

Mol. Cells
Jan 31, 2023 Vol.46 No.1, pp. 1~67
COVER PICTURE
RNAs form diverse shapes and play multiple functions as central molecules of gene expression. In this special issue on RNA, seven minireviews illustrate how basic concepts and recent RNA biology findings are transformed into new and exciting RNA therapeutics.

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