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Mol. Cells 2010; 29(2): 153-158

Published online February 28, 2010

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0019-x

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Biosynthesis of Dihydrochalcomycin:Characterization of a Deoxyallosyltransferase(gerGTI)

Binod Babu Pageni, Dinesh Simkhada, Tae-Jin Oh, and Jae Kyung Sohng*

Institute of Biomolecule Reconstruction, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 336-708, Korea

Correspondence to : *Correspondence: sohng@sunmoon.ac.kr

Received: August 17, 2009; Revised: October 20, 2009; Accepted: October 28, 2009

Abstract

Through an inactivation experiment followed by comple-mentation, the gerGTII gene was previously character-ized as a chalcosyltransferase gene involved in the biosynthesis of dihydochalcomycin. The glycosyltrans-ferase gerGTI was identified as a deoxyallosyltransferase required for the glycosylation of D-mycinose sugar. This 6-deoxyhexose sugar was converted to mycinose, via bis-O-methylation, following attachment to the polyketide lactone during dihydrochalcomycin biosynthesis. Gene sequence alignment of gerGTI to several glycosyltransferases revealed a consensus se-quence motif that appears to be characteristic of the enzymes in this sub-group of the glycosyltransferase family. To characterize its putative function, genetic disruption of gerGTI in the wild-type strain Streptomyces sp. KCTC 0041BP and in the gerGTII-deleted mutant (S. sp. ΔgerGTII), as well as complementation of gerGTII in S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI, were carried out, and the products were analyzed by LC/MS. S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI mutant produced dihydrochalconolide macrolide. S. sp. ΔgerGTI and S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI complementation of gerGTII yielded dihydrochalconolide without the mycinose sugar. The intermediate shows that gerGTI encodes a de-oxyallosyltransferase that acts after gerGTII.

Keywords biosynthesis, glycosyltransferase, macrolide, Streptomyces

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2010; 29(2): 153-158

Published online February 28, 2010 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0019-x

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Biosynthesis of Dihydrochalcomycin:Characterization of a Deoxyallosyltransferase(gerGTI)

Binod Babu Pageni, Dinesh Simkhada, Tae-Jin Oh, and Jae Kyung Sohng*

Institute of Biomolecule Reconstruction, Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asan 336-708, Korea

Correspondence to:*Correspondence: sohng@sunmoon.ac.kr

Received: August 17, 2009; Revised: October 20, 2009; Accepted: October 28, 2009

Abstract

Through an inactivation experiment followed by comple-mentation, the gerGTII gene was previously character-ized as a chalcosyltransferase gene involved in the biosynthesis of dihydochalcomycin. The glycosyltrans-ferase gerGTI was identified as a deoxyallosyltransferase required for the glycosylation of D-mycinose sugar. This 6-deoxyhexose sugar was converted to mycinose, via bis-O-methylation, following attachment to the polyketide lactone during dihydrochalcomycin biosynthesis. Gene sequence alignment of gerGTI to several glycosyltransferases revealed a consensus se-quence motif that appears to be characteristic of the enzymes in this sub-group of the glycosyltransferase family. To characterize its putative function, genetic disruption of gerGTI in the wild-type strain Streptomyces sp. KCTC 0041BP and in the gerGTII-deleted mutant (S. sp. ΔgerGTII), as well as complementation of gerGTII in S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI, were carried out, and the products were analyzed by LC/MS. S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI mutant produced dihydrochalconolide macrolide. S. sp. ΔgerGTI and S. sp. ΔgerGTII-GTI complementation of gerGTII yielded dihydrochalconolide without the mycinose sugar. The intermediate shows that gerGTI encodes a de-oxyallosyltransferase that acts after gerGTII.

Keywords: biosynthesis, glycosyltransferase, macrolide, Streptomyces

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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