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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(3): 209-213

Published online September 30, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0124-x

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

C. elegans Behavior of Preference Choice on
Bacterial Food

Emad Abd-elmoniem Abada, Hyun Sung, Meenakshi Dwivedi, Byung-Jae Park, Sun-Kyung Lee, and Joohong Ahnn

Received: June 22, 2009; Revised: July 13, 2009; Accepted: July 20, 2009

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans is a free living soil nematode and thus in its natural habitat, C. elegans encounters many different species of soil bacteria. Although some soil bacteria may be excellent sources of nutrition for the worm, others may be pathogenic. Thus, we undertook a study to understand how C. elegans can identify their preferred food using a simple behavioral assay. We found that there are various species of soil bacteria that C. elegans prefers in comparison to the standard laboratory E. coli strain OP50. In particular, two bacterial strains, Bacillus mycoides and Bacillus soli, were preferred strains. Interestingly, the sole feeding of these bacteria to wild type animals results in extended lifespan through the activation of the autophagic process. Further studies will be required to understand the precise mechanism controlling the behavior of identification and selection of food in C. elegans.

Keywords autophagy, bacterial food, behavior, lifespan, pharyngeal pumping

Article

Communication

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(3): 209-213

Published online September 30, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0124-x

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

C. elegans Behavior of Preference Choice on
Bacterial Food

Emad Abd-elmoniem Abada, Hyun Sung, Meenakshi Dwivedi, Byung-Jae Park, Sun-Kyung Lee, and Joohong Ahnn

Received: June 22, 2009; Revised: July 13, 2009; Accepted: July 20, 2009

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans is a free living soil nematode and thus in its natural habitat, C. elegans encounters many different species of soil bacteria. Although some soil bacteria may be excellent sources of nutrition for the worm, others may be pathogenic. Thus, we undertook a study to understand how C. elegans can identify their preferred food using a simple behavioral assay. We found that there are various species of soil bacteria that C. elegans prefers in comparison to the standard laboratory E. coli strain OP50. In particular, two bacterial strains, Bacillus mycoides and Bacillus soli, were preferred strains. Interestingly, the sole feeding of these bacteria to wild type animals results in extended lifespan through the activation of the autophagic process. Further studies will be required to understand the precise mechanism controlling the behavior of identification and selection of food in C. elegans.

Keywords: autophagy, bacterial food, behavior, lifespan, pharyngeal pumping

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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