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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(2): 75-80

Published online August 31, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0113-0

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

A Time to Fast, a Time to Feast: The Crosstalk
between Metabolism and the Circadian Clock

Judit Kovac, Jana Husse, and Henrik Oster

Received: July 8, 2009; Accepted: July 11, 2009

Abstract

The cyclic environmental conditions brought about by the 24 h rotation of the earth have allowed the evolution of endogenous circadian clocks that control the temporal alignment of behaviour and physiology, including the uptake and processing of nutrients. Both metabolic and circadian regulatory systems are built upon a complex feedback network connecting centres of the central nervous system and different peripheral tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian clock function is closely linked to metabolic homeostasis and that rhythm disruption can contribute to the development of metabolic disease. At the same time, metabolic processes feed back into the circadian clock, affecting clock gene expression and timing of behaviour. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence for this bimodal interaction, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms mediating this exchange, and outline the implications for clock-based and metabolic diseases.

Keywords circadian clock, clock genes, mammals, metabolic sensors, metabolism

Article

Minireview

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(2): 75-80

Published online August 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0113-0

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

A Time to Fast, a Time to Feast: The Crosstalk
between Metabolism and the Circadian Clock

Judit Kovac, Jana Husse, and Henrik Oster

Received: July 8, 2009; Accepted: July 11, 2009

Abstract

The cyclic environmental conditions brought about by the 24 h rotation of the earth have allowed the evolution of endogenous circadian clocks that control the temporal alignment of behaviour and physiology, including the uptake and processing of nutrients. Both metabolic and circadian regulatory systems are built upon a complex feedback network connecting centres of the central nervous system and different peripheral tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian clock function is closely linked to metabolic homeostasis and that rhythm disruption can contribute to the development of metabolic disease. At the same time, metabolic processes feed back into the circadian clock, affecting clock gene expression and timing of behaviour. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence for this bimodal interaction, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms mediating this exchange, and outline the implications for clock-based and metabolic diseases.

Keywords: circadian clock, clock genes, mammals, metabolic sensors, metabolism

Mol. Cells
May 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.5, pp. 273~352
COVER PICTURE
Fe2+ ion depletion-induced expression of BΔGFP at the early stage of leaf development (Choi et al., pp. 294-305).

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