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Mol. Cells 2009; 28(1): 43-48

Published online June 12, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0098-8

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

A Mutation of cdc-25.1 Causes Defects in Germ Cells But Not in Somatic Tissues in C. elegans

Jiyoung Kim, Ah-Reum Lee, Ichiro Kawasaki, Susan Strome, and Yhong-Hee Shim

Received: April 17, 2009; Revised: April 24, 2009; Accepted: April 24, 2009

Abstract

By screening C. elegans mutants for severe defects in germline proliferation, we isolated a new loss-of-function allele of cdc-25.1, bn115. bn115 and another previously identified loss-of-function allele nr2036 do not exhibit noticeable cell division defects in the somatic tissues but have reduced numbers of germ cells and are sterile, indi-cating that cdc-25.1 functions predominantly in the germ line during postembryonic development, and that cdc-25.1 activity is probably not required in somatic lineages during larval development. We analyzed cell division of germ cells and somatic tissues in bn115 homozygotes with germline-specific anti-PGL-1 immunofluorescence and GFP transgenes that express in intestinal cells, in distal tip cells, and in gonadal sheath cells, respectively. We also analyzed the expression pattern of cdc-25.1 with conventional and quantitative RT-PCR. In the presence of three other family members of cdc-25 in C. elegans, defects are observed only in the germ line but not in the somatic tissues in cdc-25.1 single mutants, and cdc-25.1 is expressed predominantly, if not exclusively, in the germ line during postembryonic stages. Our findings indicate that the function of cdc-25.1 is unique in the germ line but likely redundant with other members in the soma.

Keywords bn115, Caenorhabditis elegans, CDC-25.1, germline proliferation, somatic gonadal tissues

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(1): 43-48

Published online July 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0098-8

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

A Mutation of cdc-25.1 Causes Defects in Germ Cells But Not in Somatic Tissues in C. elegans

Jiyoung Kim, Ah-Reum Lee, Ichiro Kawasaki, Susan Strome, and Yhong-Hee Shim

Received: April 17, 2009; Revised: April 24, 2009; Accepted: April 24, 2009

Abstract

By screening C. elegans mutants for severe defects in germline proliferation, we isolated a new loss-of-function allele of cdc-25.1, bn115. bn115 and another previously identified loss-of-function allele nr2036 do not exhibit noticeable cell division defects in the somatic tissues but have reduced numbers of germ cells and are sterile, indi-cating that cdc-25.1 functions predominantly in the germ line during postembryonic development, and that cdc-25.1 activity is probably not required in somatic lineages during larval development. We analyzed cell division of germ cells and somatic tissues in bn115 homozygotes with germline-specific anti-PGL-1 immunofluorescence and GFP transgenes that express in intestinal cells, in distal tip cells, and in gonadal sheath cells, respectively. We also analyzed the expression pattern of cdc-25.1 with conventional and quantitative RT-PCR. In the presence of three other family members of cdc-25 in C. elegans, defects are observed only in the germ line but not in the somatic tissues in cdc-25.1 single mutants, and cdc-25.1 is expressed predominantly, if not exclusively, in the germ line during postembryonic stages. Our findings indicate that the function of cdc-25.1 is unique in the germ line but likely redundant with other members in the soma.

Keywords: bn115, Caenorhabditis elegans, CDC-25.1, germline proliferation, somatic gonadal tissues

Mol. Cells
Jun 30, 2023 Vol.46 No.6, pp. 329~398
COVER PICTURE
The cellular proteostasis network is adaptively modulated upon cellular stress, thereby protecting cells from proteostasis collapse. Heat shock induces the translocation of misfolded proteins and the chaperone protein HSP70 into nucleolus, where nuclear protein quality control primarily occurs. Nuclear RNA export factor 1 (green), nucleolar protein fibrillarin (red), and nuclei (blue) were visualized in NIH3T3 cells under basal (left) and heat shock (right) conditions (Park et al., pp. 374-386).

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