Top

Research Article

Split Viewer

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(1): 13-17

Published online July 31, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0103-2

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Increases the Intracellular Magnesium Concentration through the Specific Signaling Pathways

Bing-Zhe Hong, Sun-Ah Park, Han-Na Kim, Tian-Ze Ma, Han-Gyu Kim, Hyung-Sub Kang, Hwan-Gyu Kim, and Yong-Geun Kwak

Received: April 1, 2009; Revised: May 22, 2009; Accepted: June 8, 2009

Abstract

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechan-isms are not clear. Mg2+ is the most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body and plays critical roles in many cell functions. We investigated the effect of bFGF on the intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). bFGF increased [Mg2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, independent of extracellular Mg2+. This bFGF-induced [Mg2+]i increase was blocked by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostin A-23 and genistein), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) or and a phospholipase C? (PLC?) inhibitor (U73122). In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (SB202190 and PD98059) did not affect the bFGF-induced [Mg2+]i increase. These results suggest that bFGF increases the [Mg2+]i from the intracellular Mg2+ stores through the tyrosine kinase/PI3K/PLCγ-dependent signaling pathways.

Keywords angiogenesis, basic fibroblast growth factor, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, magnesium, signal transduction

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 28(1): 13-17

Published online July 31, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0103-2

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Increases the Intracellular Magnesium Concentration through the Specific Signaling Pathways

Bing-Zhe Hong, Sun-Ah Park, Han-Na Kim, Tian-Ze Ma, Han-Gyu Kim, Hyung-Sub Kang, Hwan-Gyu Kim, and Yong-Geun Kwak

Received: April 1, 2009; Revised: May 22, 2009; Accepted: June 8, 2009

Abstract

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechan-isms are not clear. Mg2+ is the most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body and plays critical roles in many cell functions. We investigated the effect of bFGF on the intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). bFGF increased [Mg2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, independent of extracellular Mg2+. This bFGF-induced [Mg2+]i increase was blocked by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostin A-23 and genistein), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) or and a phospholipase C? (PLC?) inhibitor (U73122). In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (SB202190 and PD98059) did not affect the bFGF-induced [Mg2+]i increase. These results suggest that bFGF increases the [Mg2+]i from the intracellular Mg2+ stores through the tyrosine kinase/PI3K/PLCγ-dependent signaling pathways.

Keywords: angiogenesis, basic fibroblast growth factor, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, magnesium, signal transduction

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

Share this article on

  • line
  • mail

Related articles in Mol. Cells

Molecules and Cells

eISSN 0219-1032
qr-code Download