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Mol. Cells 2009; 27(4): 409-416

Published online April 30, 2009

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0058-3

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

An ARIA-Interacting AP2 Domain Protein Is a Novel Component of ABA Signaling

Sun-ji Lee, Dong-im Cho, Jung-youn Kang, and Soo Young Kim

Received: December 14, 2009; Revised: January 20, 2009; Accepted: January 21, 2009

Abstract

ADAP is an AP2-domain protein that interacts with ARIA, which, in turn, interacts with ABF2, a bZIP class transcription factor. ABF2 regulates various aspects of the abscisic acid (ABA) response by controlling the expression of a subset of ABA-responsive genes. Our expression analyses indicate that ADAP is expressed in roots, emerging young leaves, and flowers. We found that adap knockout mutant lines germinate more efficiently than wild-type plants and that the mutant seedlings grow faster. This suggests that ADAP is involved in the regulation of germination and seedling growth. Both germination and postgermination growth of the knockout mutants were partially insensitive to ABA, which indicates that ADAP is required for a full ABA response. The survival rates for mutants from which water was withheld were low compared with those for wild-type plants. The result shows that ADAP is necessary for the response to stress induced by water deprivation. Together, our data indicate that ADAP is a positive regulator of the ABA response and is also in-volved in regulating seedling growth. The role of ADAP is similar to that of ARIA, which is also a positive regulator of the ABA response. It appears that ADAP acts through the same ABA response pathway as ARIA.

Keywords Abscisic acid (ABA), ABF, abiotic stress, Arm protein

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2009; 27(4): 409-416

Published online April 30, 2009 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10059-009-0058-3

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

An ARIA-Interacting AP2 Domain Protein Is a Novel Component of ABA Signaling

Sun-ji Lee, Dong-im Cho, Jung-youn Kang, and Soo Young Kim

Received: December 14, 2009; Revised: January 20, 2009; Accepted: January 21, 2009

Abstract

ADAP is an AP2-domain protein that interacts with ARIA, which, in turn, interacts with ABF2, a bZIP class transcription factor. ABF2 regulates various aspects of the abscisic acid (ABA) response by controlling the expression of a subset of ABA-responsive genes. Our expression analyses indicate that ADAP is expressed in roots, emerging young leaves, and flowers. We found that adap knockout mutant lines germinate more efficiently than wild-type plants and that the mutant seedlings grow faster. This suggests that ADAP is involved in the regulation of germination and seedling growth. Both germination and postgermination growth of the knockout mutants were partially insensitive to ABA, which indicates that ADAP is required for a full ABA response. The survival rates for mutants from which water was withheld were low compared with those for wild-type plants. The result shows that ADAP is necessary for the response to stress induced by water deprivation. Together, our data indicate that ADAP is a positive regulator of the ABA response and is also in-volved in regulating seedling growth. The role of ADAP is similar to that of ARIA, which is also a positive regulator of the ABA response. It appears that ADAP acts through the same ABA response pathway as ARIA.

Keywords: Abscisic acid (ABA), ABF, abiotic stress, Arm protein

Mol. Cells
Sep 30, 2022 Vol.45 No.9, pp. 603~672
COVER PICTURE
The Target of Rapamycin Complex (TORC) is a central regulatory hub in eukaryotes, which is well conserved in diverse plant species, including tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inhibition of TORC genes (SlTOR, SlLST8, and SlRAPTOR) by VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) results in early fruit ripening in tomato. The red/ orange tomatoes are early-ripened TORC-silenced fruits, while the green tomato is a control fruit. Top, left, control fruit (TRV2-myc); top, right, TRV2-SlLST8; bottom, left, TRV2-SlTOR; bottom, right, TRV2-SlRAPTOR(Choi et al., pp. 660-672).

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