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Mol. Cells 2001; 12(3): 342-346

Published online December 31, 2001

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Effects of Ginsenosides on Vanilloid Receptor (VR1) Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

Se-Yeon Jung, Seok Choi, Yoo-Seung Ko, Chul-Seung Park, Seikwan Oh, Sung-Ryong Koh, Uhtaek Oh, Jae-Wook Oh, Man-Hee Rhee, Seung-Yeol Nah

Abstract

Ginsenosides, or ginseng saponins, are biologically active ingredients of Panax ginseng. Accumulating evidence suggests that ginsenosides can alleviate pain from injections of noxious chemicals, such as capsaicin [Nah et al. (2000)]. In this study we examined the ef-fects of ginsenoside Rc on the capsaicin-induced in-ward current in Xenopus oocytes that expresses the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Ginsenoside Rc enhanced the capsaicin-induced inward current in a concentra-tion-dependent and reversible manner, but ginsenoside Rc itself elicited no membrane currents. The VR1 an-tagonist capsazepine almost completely blocked the inward current that was elicited by capsaicin plus gin-senoside Rc. We also tested the effect of seven other fractionated ginsenosides (i.e., Rb1, Rb2, Rd, Re, Rf, Rg1, and Rg2) in addition to ginsenoside Rc. We found that six of them significantly enhanced the inward current that is induced by capsaicin with the following order of potency: Rc > Rf > Rg1 ?Rd > Rb2 > Rb1. These results show the possibility that the in vivo effect of ginsenosides against capsaicin-induced pain is de-rived from their modulation of the VR1 channel func-tion.

Keywords Ginsenosides, Vanilloid Receptor, Capsaicin, Pain

Article

Research Article

Mol. Cells 2001; 12(3): 342-346

Published online December 31, 2001

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Effects of Ginsenosides on Vanilloid Receptor (VR1) Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

Se-Yeon Jung, Seok Choi, Yoo-Seung Ko, Chul-Seung Park, Seikwan Oh, Sung-Ryong Koh, Uhtaek Oh, Jae-Wook Oh, Man-Hee Rhee, Seung-Yeol Nah

Abstract

Ginsenosides, or ginseng saponins, are biologically active ingredients of Panax ginseng. Accumulating evidence suggests that ginsenosides can alleviate pain from injections of noxious chemicals, such as capsaicin [Nah et al. (2000)]. In this study we examined the ef-fects of ginsenoside Rc on the capsaicin-induced in-ward current in Xenopus oocytes that expresses the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Ginsenoside Rc enhanced the capsaicin-induced inward current in a concentra-tion-dependent and reversible manner, but ginsenoside Rc itself elicited no membrane currents. The VR1 an-tagonist capsazepine almost completely blocked the inward current that was elicited by capsaicin plus gin-senoside Rc. We also tested the effect of seven other fractionated ginsenosides (i.e., Rb1, Rb2, Rd, Re, Rf, Rg1, and Rg2) in addition to ginsenoside Rc. We found that six of them significantly enhanced the inward current that is induced by capsaicin with the following order of potency: Rc > Rf > Rg1 ?Rd > Rb2 > Rb1. These results show the possibility that the in vivo effect of ginsenosides against capsaicin-induced pain is de-rived from their modulation of the VR1 channel func-tion.

Keywords: Ginsenosides, Vanilloid Receptor, Capsaicin, Pain

Mol. Cells
Jul 31, 2022 Vol.45 No.7, pp. 435~512
COVER PICTURE
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells capable of differentiating into mesodermal lineages like adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic. Alcian blue-positive extracellular matrix secreted by chondrocytes in the lacuna confirmed the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs (Bashyal et al., pp. 479-494).

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