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Mol. Cells

Published online October 29, 2021

© The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology

Mechanisms of Carboxylic Acid Attraction in Drosophila melanogaster

Bhanu Shrestha1 and Youngseok Lee1,2,*

1Department of Bio and Fermentation Convergence Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Korea, 2Interdisciplinary Program for Bio-Health Convergence, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Korea

Correspondence to : ylee@kookmin.ac.kr

Received: August 2, 2021; Revised: September 7, 2021; Accepted: October 15, 2021

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/.

Abstract

Sour is one of the fundamental taste modalities that enable taste perception in animals. Chemoreceptors embedded in taste organs are pivotal to discriminate between different chemicals to ensure survival. Animals generally prefer slightly acidic food and avoid highly acidic alternatives. We recently proposed that all acids are aversive at high concentrations, a response that is mediated by low pH as well as specific anions in Drosophila melanogaster. Particularly, some carboxylic acids such as glycolic acid, citric acid, and lactic acid are highly attractive to Drosophila compared with acetic acid. The present study determined that attractive carboxylic acids were mediated by broadly expressed Ir25a and Ir76b, as demonstrated by a candidate mutant library screen. The mutant deficits were completely recovered via wild-type cDNA expression in sweet-sensing gustatory receptor neurons. Furthermore, sweet gustatory receptors such as Gr5a, Gr61a, and Gr64a-f modulate attractive responses. These genetic defects were confirmed using binary food choice assays as well as electrophysiology in the labellum. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that at least two different kinds of receptors are required to discriminate attractive carboxylic acids from other acids.

Keywords citric acid, glycolic acid, gustatory receptor, ionotropic receptor, lactic acid

Article

On-line First

Mol. Cells

Published online October 29, 2021

Copyright © The Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Mechanisms of Carboxylic Acid Attraction in Drosophila melanogaster

Bhanu Shrestha1 and Youngseok Lee1,2,*

1Department of Bio and Fermentation Convergence Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Korea, 2Interdisciplinary Program for Bio-Health Convergence, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Korea

Correspondence to:ylee@kookmin.ac.kr

Received: August 2, 2021; Revised: September 7, 2021; Accepted: October 15, 2021

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/.

Abstract

Sour is one of the fundamental taste modalities that enable taste perception in animals. Chemoreceptors embedded in taste organs are pivotal to discriminate between different chemicals to ensure survival. Animals generally prefer slightly acidic food and avoid highly acidic alternatives. We recently proposed that all acids are aversive at high concentrations, a response that is mediated by low pH as well as specific anions in Drosophila melanogaster. Particularly, some carboxylic acids such as glycolic acid, citric acid, and lactic acid are highly attractive to Drosophila compared with acetic acid. The present study determined that attractive carboxylic acids were mediated by broadly expressed Ir25a and Ir76b, as demonstrated by a candidate mutant library screen. The mutant deficits were completely recovered via wild-type cDNA expression in sweet-sensing gustatory receptor neurons. Furthermore, sweet gustatory receptors such as Gr5a, Gr61a, and Gr64a-f modulate attractive responses. These genetic defects were confirmed using binary food choice assays as well as electrophysiology in the labellum. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that at least two different kinds of receptors are required to discriminate attractive carboxylic acids from other acids.

Keywords: citric acid, glycolic acid, gustatory receptor, ionotropic receptor, lactic acid

Mol. Cells
Nov 30, 2021 Vol.44 No.11, pp. 781~860
COVER PICTURE
3D quantitative images of the vesicular structure and the nucleolus using label free optical diffraction tomography (Kim et al., pp. 851-860).

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